Do I need a chimney liner?

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OverMyHead

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House built in 72. Probably the original oil furnace. I've owned since 97. Where the flue enters the chimney to the top measures 5.5 feet. It is located in the utility room(unheated) but not on the outside wall.

I posted a question in another subforum regarding the chimney. Someone mentioned I needed a liner. I've run across info stating furnace efficiency determines the need for a liner. I don't know the model of my furnace but I assume it's a "Mid-efficiency heating system" according to the dept of energy website.

I've attached a couple of pictures showing the broken mortar around where the flue entered the chimney. And a shot from the opening up the chimney.

Thanks

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OverMyHead

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Suggestions on type of liner to get for a <6' run?

Guess I'll need a chimney cap as well. That's ok. Interested in trying my hand at some masonry.
 

Snoonyb

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There are basically 2 methods of approach.

As mentioned, you probably eventually need a flue liner.

You can have the chimney inspected for masonry failures which can allow exhaust gasses to leak back into the dwelling, or you can skip the inspection, install the liner and either a masonry cap or a sheetmetal cap.
 

OverMyHead

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Thanks. I'll probably be looking at a rigid liner though. Only needing 6', I'd hate to have almost 20' left after the install. Might give those guys a call.

And yeah, I'll skip the inspection. If I just do the liner, hopefully I can forget about it for quite a while.

Also, I don't know why that brick and piece of metal spanning the opening are there. I will have to cut out at least the metal.
 
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