Drywall in garage

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by cfd1984, Jan 9, 2019.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Jan 9, 2019 #1

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    3
    My home was built in the late 50's and the wallboard throughout the house looks like drywall board with plaster on top of that. There is also a wire strip in all of the inside corners that connects the 2 together. Not sure what type of drywall/plaster this is... Gypsome lath??

    My plan is tear it all out in the garage to add outlets and insulation for a wood shop. If I take the ceiling down, how should I support the garage door tracks before I get the new drywall hung. My plan is to replace with a new door, so I may just coordinate that with me hanging new drywall.

    The other option would be to leave the ceiling in place and just replace the walls. If I go that route, how would I tape the wall/ceiling joint? Wall would be drywall and the ceiling is plater. Is it the same and taping drywall.

    thanks
     
  2. Jan 9, 2019 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,651
    Likes Received:
    3,330
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    If it is in good shape I would leave it and you can just drywall tape it.
     
  3. Jan 9, 2019 #3

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,707
    Likes Received:
    695
    It sounds more like you have rock lath and plaster, so when you have the demo done, a photo or 2 would help.
     
    nealtw likes this.
  4. Jan 9, 2019 #4

    Gary

    Gary

    Gary

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    455
    Our dining room had plaster & lathe that was in poor shape. I didn't want to take it down along with all the blown in insulation & decades of dust in the attic, ( this part of the house is well over 100 yrs. old). So, I screwed 1/2" sheet rock over it, taped & mudded the joints, and it's been up there for 28 years without so much as a crack. I used crown moulding to hide the ceiling to wall seem, but it could have been finished with tape also. We just liked the moulding to give the dining room a more formal look.
     
  5. Jan 9, 2019 #5

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,707
    Likes Received:
    695
    As far as that goes, why not just surface mount the elec., no demo, no cleanup and no taping.
     
    kok328 likes this.
  6. Jan 9, 2019 #6

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    3
    Ill get some pictures uploaded on Thursday when I get home from work. I would rather remove it so I can add insulation and there were a bunch of large holes in the walls from the previous owner. The ceiling does have some cracks in it, but Im thinking this is going to be a huge project for me If I try and pull that ceiling down.
     
  7. Jan 9, 2019 #7

    joecaption

    joecaption

    joecaption

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,294
    Likes Received:
    380
    Have a plan for what to do with it once you knock it down.
    That stuffs going to be really heavy, may want to consider renting a small dumpster.
    For a clean break in the inside corners I use a 4-1/2 grinder with a diamond wheel and a brick chisel for the tight spots at the top and bottom of the walls, the cleaner the joint is the easyer to finish.
    Any nails left sticking out, just pound them in, far faster than pulling them all out.
    Going to need dust mask, leather gloves, I also wear one of those cheap painters overalls to keep the dust off my clothes and a ball cap to keep it out of what little hair I have left.
    I also place a cheap box fan in the window blowing out. (make sure to remove the screen)
    I'd be using 5/8 sheetrock not 1/2 to help make up for the difference in thickness of the new and old.
    Alway try and install it horizontal and always start at the top to make sure there's a tight seam at the wall to ceiling joint.
    Always leave about a 1/2" gap at the bottom to make up for uneven floor and to prevent wicking.
    If the wall height is much over 8' tall you can buy sheetrock that's 4' 6" wide so there no narrow piece that's hard to finish and one less seam to deal with.
     
  8. Jan 9, 2019 #8

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2018
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    North Reading, MA
    Around my area, the code requires 5/8" fire rated sheet rock in an attached garage. That stuff is heavy!
     
  9. Jan 9, 2019 #9

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,651
    Likes Received:
    3,330
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    4x8x 5/8 is about 73 pounds but if feels like 120,
     
  10. Jan 9, 2019 #10

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2018
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    North Reading, MA
    Exactly! I typically work alone on all my DIY projects. But I feel myself getting weaker with age. I opted to have the ceiling done by others.
    Although I was thinking about one of these devices.
    57475_2000x2000.jpg
     
    Sparky617 and nealtw like this.
  11. Jan 10, 2019 #11

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,707
    Likes Received:
    695
    And to think, when I was a lot younger and a lot dumber, I used to carry 2, 5/8 upstairs myself.

    That's how piece work goes.

    Re: the wall insulation, you can drill 2-1/2" holes in the plaster and blow insulation in.
     
  12. Jan 10, 2019 #12

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    5,240
    Likes Received:
    1,849
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    I will add another two cents.


    It is a garage soon to be workshop that is 60 plus years old. I assume you are doing insulation because you plan on heating or cooling the space. We don’t know your climate and we don’t know how you will use the space? Will you heat and cool it year round or just when you use it? Will you be out there in the cold of winter and want it warm like your home?


    I would not take down the plaster at all. If I really needed year round cooling and heating I would cut holes and blow in insulation. If I was just to heat it when it was used I would get a large heat source that can quickly heat the air while I’m out there and skip the insulation. I would abandon the old wiring disconnecting it on both ends remove boxes and outlets etc all the way back to where the power comes in at least. Cover it all in .5 drywall using longer screws. If you do the ceiling rent a drywall lift for a couple days if working alone or buy one from harbor freight and when done sell it on line. I would do all the wiring on the inside with conduit. Size your power like it is a shop and if you need a larger supply service with a new breaker in the house add that. I have 100 amps 240v to my garage and love it. I do welding and have a good size compressor. With all your lights and outlets on the surface it will be easy to add new if you need it down the road. Ceiling outlets are handy as you can drop power down to a machine without tripping over cords. Put your compressor in an out of the way location and run lines the same as you did the electrical on the surface.


    Just my thoughts. I actually left my big garage un insulated and un heated and have a small 14x14 work shop I insulated and have heat and AC to. I just run them when I’m working or if I have paint drying or something in there. I keep all my tools in the small work shop and save big projects for warm weather in the big garage.
     
  13. Jan 10, 2019 #13

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thanks for all the replies. I had a dumpster in the driveway from another project, so today I tore down all the old plaster on the walls and ceiling. I had some large holes in the walls and the ceiling was sagging in a few places and had cracks in most of the seams. I took down the garage door tracks because Im going to be replacing with a new door. A friend of mine is an electrician, so he is coming by to wire everything for me. I have never had a dedicated shop space, so now I'm trying to figure out where I want outlets. As far a heating, I plan on doing something??? I live in Ohio, so the winters are cold, but Im not worried about having it cooled for the summer months.

    Thanks
     
  14. Jan 19, 2019 #14

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    cfd1984

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    3
    Update.... Electric is done and new garage door install is scheduled. I have the ceiling and walls hung, ready to tape. Do I need to worry about the cold temps while taping and mudding? It is in the 20s-30s during the day and dropping into the teens over night.
     
  15. Jan 19, 2019 #15

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Diehard

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2018
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    North Reading, MA
    Sounds like there are many considerations.
    Here's one of many write-ups on the subject.
    http://www.thisisdrywall.com/?p=267
    and another...
    http://www.drywalltalk.com/f7/finishing-freezing-weather-240/
     
  16. Apr 4, 2019 #16

    thebuilder20

    thebuilder20

    thebuilder20

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2019
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    UK
    I've drywalled two garages and three and a half houses -- +1 on all the advice you've received . . . . it IS a lot of work, and, clearly, folks that do it regularly are faster/better, but you CAN achieve excellent results as a DIYer . . . .
    Since my drywall compound and my bondo techniques are the same (apply five pounds, sand off 4.8, breakthrough, reapply, etc, etc lather rinse repeat), I've decided to let the pros handle any drywall work I need in the future
     
    nealtw likes this.

Share This Page