Fence height

Discussion in 'Decks & Patios' started by swimmer_spe, Dec 29, 2018.

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  1. Dec 29, 2018 #1

    swimmer_spe

    swimmer_spe

    swimmer_spe

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    Ignoring local bylaws, what would be the lowest height that a fence should be to prevent most medium sized dogs escaping?

    I plan on getting a dog. I have a backyard that is not enclosed. part of the yard is where I throw the snow in the winter with my snowblower. So, I am wanting a low fence that I can still throw snow over.

    Before I build, I will make sure it fits within the local bylaw, but I think they only say maximum height, not minimum.
     
  2. Dec 29, 2018 #2

    joecaption

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    My med. dog can clear a 4' fence easy.
    Partly depends on what bred you get how high there able to jump.
     
  3. Dec 29, 2018 #3

    bud16415

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    A medium size young dog can get over a 4 footer and a medium size old dog will find it too much work to get over a 2 footer.


    A lot of people around here have invisible fence and it seems to work really well if you take the time to teach your dog.


    I have always had a dog run ether closed in with fencing or a cable type and when the dog was off lead I was working with them. Don’t get a puppy unless you have the time to work with them and for the first year it is a lot of time.
     
  4. Dec 29, 2018 #4

    Snoonyb

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    With chain link you can blow snow thru the fabric, besides which, if the fence is not on your property line, or intended to establish a specific property boundary, the city ordinance should not apply.
     
  5. Dec 29, 2018 #5

    swimmer_spe

    swimmer_spe

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    I want a wood fence. Chain link looks so ghetto.
     
  6. Dec 29, 2018 #6

    Snoonyb

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    Not specified in post #1, so when it gets full of graffiti, you'll think chain link.
     
  7. Dec 30, 2018 #7

    swimmer_spe

    swimmer_spe

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    I live in an area that doesn't seem to get graffiti on it.
     
  8. Dec 30, 2018 #8

    nealtw

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    The dogs that don't jump, dig.
     
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  9. Dec 30, 2018 #9

    swimmer_spe

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    One problem at a time.
     
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  10. Dec 30, 2018 #10

    68bucks

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    My son has a dog that can just about rest his chin on a kitchen counter but won't jump my 4' fence. I think it's mainly because he doesn't know he could. He also won't go up a flight of steps. My son only has like 1 step in his house so the dog isn't used to them I guess. It's pretty funny to see this big ole dog stand at the foot of our stair and look bewildered. As someone said, depends on the dog to a large degree.
     
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  11. Jan 1, 2019 #11

    Diehard

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    Should decide on the dog, and/or get the dog first.
    I would go a bit taller on a fence and get a better snow blower.:D
     
  12. Jan 2, 2019 #12

    raymond-

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    if squirrels run along the top rail of your fence and your dog has a high prey drive make it a taller then planned
     
  13. Jan 2, 2019 #13

    Black Mariah

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    I have a lot of experience in this area. Live in rural Nevada and have 2 German Shepherds and 1 Husky (75 lbs, 70 lbs, 55 lbs.). Some would call these big dogs, but others might think of them as "medium sized".

    For these dogs, fences are just a suggestion. They have gotten over any sort of fence up to 6 ft. (smooth wood slat, chain link, welded wire "field fence", even a wrought iron vertical post "no climb" fence)... If there is enough room to do a run up, they can potentially clear like high jumper. Otherwise it is a process of jumping to pull themselves up (like a chin-up), and then scramble over top . They will seek out the weakest point or any sort of horizontal crossbar or any available intermediate point for leverage / toe-hold. Gates and latches always seems to provide something like this.

    I've also had German Shepherds in the past who had no interest in scaling fences, even low ones... Could physically do it, just wasn't their thing.

    If you have an escape artist dog, then you will have to think about dog-proofing the fence. Here are some things to keep in mind:

    1. Not sure where you are located, but most places in the U.S. will have fence height restrictions (as local government "ordinances") ONLY at the property line. Elsewhere on your land, you are free to do what you want.... unless you live in some sort of "planned community" which has its own set of restrictions (i.e. CC&R's).

    2. Fence height is not the be-all, end-all. You have to remove or obstruct the escape / fence-scaling means. So, if the dog needs a run up to jump over/onto a fence, interrupt the run up path with hedges near the fence. If the dog is gaining leverage on a horizontal support, or latch, or... then move that item to the other side of the fence, or leave on same side and face in a smooth material.

    Some people even dig trenches on the "inside" side of a fence, thereby keeping with the overall fence height restriction (e.g. 6 ft. from grade when viewed from the outside), but making it essentially a 7 ft. or 8 ft. fence to get over from the inside.

    3. If you have a real jumper / escape artist, then you will probably have to go with either "lean ins" (think about the 45 degree angled fence 'topper' you might see around a prison yard, but WITHOUT the RAZOR WIRE!!!) or "coyote rollers".

    4. The "invisible fence" (signal wire buried along perimeter of property, which activates a shock collar worn by the dog when he gets close) works in certain cases. Best as a training aid to deter a young dog from ever getting interested in the fence in the first place. Some dogs get shocked once and will forever stay away. With other dogs you have to keep the collar charged and on them at all times, which is a pain -- and after a couple escape-free months you will stop doing it (and a smart dog will KNOW that you stopped doing it... Ask me how I know).

    5. As others have said, once you completely dog-proof the "over the top" escape method, a determined dog will dig underneath. Then you get into the whole discussion of burying chicken wire or chain link, or even having a concrete footing at the base of the fence.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2019
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  14. Jan 3, 2019 #14

    swimmer_spe

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    1) 8 feet high, and that applies to all fencing.

    2) I am thinking of raised planter boxes with various greenery planted in them around the inside edge along the fence.

    3) I hope not, but if I have to, I can.

    4) I have though of that too. I may do both.

    5) that is why the planter boxes will be there. It looks beautiful and it slows an escape.

    Really, if the dog is that bad, they stay on a leash.
     
  15. Jul 14, 2019 #15

    thebuilder20

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    Not sure what exactly is the limit for fence height in your area, but you might want to check that out first. I've been reading up on wall/fence rights and boundaries (here) and depending on the work that you would be doing in your fence and how strict laws are in your state is, you might need to give notice for this. Anyway, if you're getting a pup first, I think you can manage to train it not to go over the fence.
     
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  16. Aug 8, 2019 #16

    Ben Ashlock

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    It is going to depend on the dog, I had a medium sized dog that would scale a 6 ft fence. We got her from the pound so she was already an escape artist. Training from a young age definitely helps.
     

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