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General Electric A1g48t waffle iron

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vdotmatrix

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I‘ve had this waffle iron as long as I can remember and we use it now for a sandwich press...

The power cord got damaged at some point and it was taped. The thing works just fine except the power cord gets warm and that means resistance and fire hazard.

When i took it to my local appliance shack they wanted $50 to put a new power cord on, and yesterday , I said how hard could it be?

when i looked at it, it has each conductor clipped to some stainless rods that go into the unit.

i just need to attach the new power cord to these wire terminals. I thought i would be able to do something with the clips but no idea what these clips Are or how they were pressed into place.

The shop said they would need to solder something.....i keep say how hard could this be, but i guess they dont wire stuff like this anymore.

Any ideas?463D3068-E091-4D56-9A3C-5B7B8D28993F.jpeg1EBF4238-B967-499D-849E-52F01FFD5F7D.jpeg Thanks in advance for looking!
 

bud16415

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I would shorten the cord back to a point before the damaged point and put on a high quality industrial plug rated for higher amp draw. Then likely the cord will be too short so I would make a short extension cord with the same quality M/F ends about 4’ long.



Leave the factory connectors alone is my suggestion.

I worked for the above mentioned company for 43 years and that was from a time when we knew how to build something. You likely wont find a new one that good unless you buy something made for a commercial kitchen.
 

vdotmatrix

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I would shorten the cord back to a point before the damaged point and put on a high quality industrial plug rated for higher amp draw. Then likely the cord will be too short so I would make a short extension cord with the same quality M/F ends about 4’ long.



Leave the factory connectors alone is my suggestion.

I worked for the above mentioned company for 43 years and that was from a time when we knew how to build something. You likely wont find a new one that good unless you buy something made for a commercial kitchen.
That is exactly what the repair shop said, about build quality. I think i will do what you said and make a 12-14ga short extension cord. Big thank you.
BTW, what is that clip or attachment for the power cord Anyway?
 

bud16415

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I'm not sure, but it looks like a special crimp on connection. It might be hard to find that and likely why they were talking about soldering something.
 

vdotmatrix

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I'm not sure, but it looks like a special crimp on connection. It might be hard to find that and likely why they were talking about soldering something.
When i saw that, i wanted no part of a half assed vintage Repair I would make and had to post here... Thank you.
 

Jeff Handy

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Let the repair shop fix it, it is worth saving, built like a tank.

The cord will get warm, that is normal for a high wattage heating appliance.

Warm, but not hot.

Make sure they install a polarized plug, and they get the neutral/hot wiring correct.
It is likely a 20 amp type plug.
 

Eddie_T

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I would check the damaged area to see what the damage really is. If the conductor is not compromised a good taping may be adequate. If the conductor is damaged there are crimp splices available for repair and then tape and/or heat shrink for protection.
 

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