Help! Need Solutions to Concrete Basement

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aka23

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I purchased a historic home that has the original concrete basement floors. However, recently the house was sinking and has since been deconstructed, raised and rebuilt on only on the necessary areas- the south/ south east corner. So less than half of the concrete basement is newer. My issue is the other part of the basement that is not new is cracked and if one were to "knock" on sections it would sound hollow. Also, close to the limestone foundation walls the concrete dips down about 2 or 3 inches. There are also large areas about 3 ft in diameter where spalling has occurred. My question is: Without removing the old concrete and entirely replacing it with new concrete what are some fixes that would resolve the issue? and perhaps slow further deterioration, level out the surface and get that awesome smoothed industrial look? I was thinking there might be a semi "flexible" concrete material that would stick to the original, but be strong enough to hold back deterioration and perhaps give a little. Please, if you have experience with this type of problem your solutions are welcomed! I tried to include photos, but not sure the best way to do this... I don't have a URL.
 

slownsteady

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You're saying that the necessary areas of the basement were repaired. Is this other damaged area a new problem, or was it considered not worth repairing?
 

EmmaTaylor

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There are certain situations when it’s best to tear out existing concrete and start a new by pouring on a compacted stone or sand base. For instance, if you have large working cracks in your slab and the concrete has settled to the point that it’s at several different levels, you should remove it. But in that you need to hire a licensed and professional flooring contractor that you can find easily in online directories like Porch etc. If done properly, new concrete can often be poured right over an existing slab. For this to be feasible, the contractor needs to pour at least 2 inches thick, use smaller aggregate, and incorporate reinforcement such as welded wire mesh or fiber mixed into the concrete. Steel rebar is also a good idea if the slab is thick enough to allow it.

Emma Taylor.
 

stadry

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wire mesh's usless in a 4" thick slab,,, #3 rebar would require a 4 3/8" thick placement while #4 bar needs 4 1/2" thickness,,, however, that only counts IF 1 adheres to aci specs/recommendations,,, no pro would use wire mesh in a 4" slab as placement is critical on a vertical axis,,, bonded/unbonded overlays won't work either
 

slownsteady

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wire mesh's usless in a 4" thick slab,,, #3 rebar would require a 4 3/8" thick placement while #4 bar needs 4 1/2" thickness,,, however, that only counts IF 1 adheres to aci specs/recommendations,,, no pro would use wire mesh in a 4" slab as placement is critical on a vertical axis,,, bonded/unbonded overlays won't work either
I understand that you're the voice of the pro on this site, but now that you've told us what won't work, would you like to suggest something?
 

aka23

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Yes, stadry would you like to add a solution to the issue?
 

bud16415

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IMO the time to have done it would have been during the reconstruction. What it looks like to me is someone tried an overlay in that area and that’s what you are seeing failing. Having had two of this type old homes I have found that most of the time they started out as dirt floors and at some point the homeowner mixed and poured an inch or two thick floor over the dirt to keep the dust down and the smell down. Later people come along and add more to smooth it out. The right thing to do is take it out see what’s down there get it level and to a depth you want and then start building a new floor on top.

How much head room do you have now?

There could be products you could pour down but you might get the same cracks back and have wasted more money. I know some members don’t care for adding wire mesh to a 4” slab and it might be a regional thing but they do it a lot around here. After they pour they pull it up with a hook to about mid point. It might not do any good but I don’t see it hurting. Just my opinion.

I would ether do it right or just patch it in to smooth it out and hope for the best.
 

nealtw

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I understand that you're the voice of the pro on this site, but now that you've told us what won't work, would you like to suggest something?
:hide: Way to technical for the average simple minded DIYer to understand or better to apply in the real working world.
 

nealtw

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On the chance of being wrong I will suggest and at the worst we can learn all the do not methods for a repair.
I would just chip up all that is loose as it is probibly just s service cover coat that did not stick to the old. Once the origainal service is visible proper repair suggestions can be made.
 

aka23

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I was told that the cement floor that is cracking is the original floor. Yes, I do think it was a dump and stir cement floor. I'm not sure why the previous owners didn't replace the entire floor, I imagine it was the cost. The house rebuild for just part of the home was 95K. I'm assuming they were trying to save where they could. The house is historic and had to have all the limestone rocks numbered and re-stacked the same way and historic home specialists had to be there etc...

Thanks nealtw, but I get what stadry was saying. I really just want to just get a bunch of different opinions on how other people would handle this issue. I don't think I'm going to DIY this project given it's size.
 

nealtw

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I was told that the cement floor that is cracking is the original floor. Yes, I do think it was a dump and stir cement floor. I'm not sure why the previous owners didn't replace the entire floor, I imagine it was the cost. The house rebuild for just part of the home was 95K. I'm assuming they were trying to save where they could. The house is historic and had to have all the limestone rocks numbered and re-stacked the same way and historic home specialists had to be there etc...

Thanks nealtw, but I get what stadry was saying. I really just want to just get a bunch of different opinions on how other people would handle this issue. I don't think I'm going to DIY this project given it's size.
I wouldn't do it myself either but I think the knowledge of what needs to done or what might be done or what could be looked for does serve a purpose.

We wouldn't want you to go hire the same pro to attempt the same fix again.
 

stadry

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there ain't no ' bunch of different opinions ' - you either do it right OR live w/whatever f'd up method is used,,, by now you should already know what doesn't work - @ least 1, anyway,,, carpenters disagree on mtls/methods, concretists don't

why do folks insist on reinventing wheels ?
 

nealtw

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there ain't no ' bunch of different opinions ' - you either do it right OR live w/whatever f'd up method is used,,, by now you should already know what doesn't work - @ least 1, anyway,,, carpenters disagree on mtls/methods, concretists don't

why do folks insist on reinventing wheels ?
So the only DIY solution is get a pro, we don't: no: YOU don't know that wasn't a contractor and the home owner dosn't know what was done as it was before they bought it. Thanks.
 

stadry

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not at all - any competent diy'er can do this work provided its properly evaluated, yada, yada, yada
 
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