Hose Bib installed in laundry-room.

House Repair Talk

Help Support House Repair Talk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

tk3000

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Messages
398
Reaction score
43
Hello Folks,

Recently, I replaced the water valves for my washing machine supply lines with hose bibs (the type that most people use outside for a garden hose). The thread is a perfect match and the bib’s angle is a good fit for my situation.

Also, instead of a brass “90deg ear cup x F elbow” like the following:

Everbilt 1/2 in. Bronze Silicon Alloy Lead-Free Pressure 90-Degree Drop Ear Cup X F Elbow C70735LFHD12 - The Home Depot

I simply soldered the hose bib directly to a 90deg copper elbow, as shown below:

hose_bibs_laundry.jpg


It is all perfectly functional but was wondering if there is any issue with this setup in terms of code or otherwise. Thanks for any insight.
 
You do nice work, TK3000!

Where I live, the city requires Hose Bibb Vacuum Breakers on laundry machine hose bibbs. I even had to put one on the dryer's steam water hose bibb. I'd not worry about it unless you ever are told to install them.

It makes no sense because laundry machines have an air gap built in, but "Rules Is Rules".

Paul

I suppose one could unscrew the hose from the machine, stick it in a bucket of dirty water and wait years for a back-siphon event strong enough to get to the basement.
 
Where I live, t

You do nice work, TK3000!

Where I live, the city requires Hose Bibb Vacuum Breakers on laundry machine hose bibbs. I even had to put one on the dryer's steam water hose bibb. I'd not worry about it unless you ever are told to install them.

It makes no sense because laundry machines have an air gap built in, but "Rules Is Rules".

Paul

I suppose one could unscrew the hose from the machine, stick it in a bucket of dirty water and wait years for a back-siphon event strong enough to get to the basement.

bud16415 & PJB12, thanks a lot for your kind words and insights!
 
After re-visiting your photo, it occurred to me that you may (or may not) get water hammer when a washing machine solenoid closes. It's like a "Bang" sound & you will see the hose jump a bit.

It that happens, the easiest thing to try is take a longer hose and loop it in a big circle. Tie the loop together with a nylon tie or string where the hose crosses itself (to maintain a loop). It may absorb the shock.

Plan B is to purchase a water hammer arrestor for each supply.
Sioux Chief makes ones in size A that are specifically for laundry machines. (Item #660-H) They have hose threads.

You can also cut-in tees on your supply copper (1/2 sweat x 1/2 sweat x 1/2 F-NPT) and use any horizontal approved arrestor.
Paul
 
Hello Folks,

Recently, I replaced the water valves for my washing machine supply lines with hose bibs (the type that most people use outside for a garden hose). The thread is a perfect match and the bib’s angle is a good fit for my situation.

Also, instead of a brass “90deg ear cup x F elbow” like the following:

Everbilt 1/2 in. Bronze Silicon Alloy Lead-Free Pressure 90-Degree Drop Ear Cup X F Elbow C70735LFHD12 - The Home Depot

I simply soldered the hose bib directly to a 90deg copper elbow, as shown below:

View attachment 32403


It is all perfectly functional but was wondering if there is any issue with this setup in terms of code or otherwise. Thanks for any insight.
The only question I would have is inputting the appliance to the wall, because in direct proximity could hold the appliance 4"+ from the wall, and could lead to lost clothing either in parts of pairs, or items.
 
After re-visiting your photo, it occurred to me that you may (or may not) get water hammer when a washing machine solenoid closes. It's like a "Bang" sound & you will see the hose jump a bit.

It that happens, the easiest thing to try is take a longer hose and loop it in a big circle. Tie the loop together with a nylon tie or string where the hose crosses itself (to maintain a loop). It may absorb the shock.

Plan B is to purchase a water hammer arrestor for each supply.
Sioux Chief makes ones in size A that are specifically for laundry machines. (Item #660-H) They have hose threads.

You can also cut-in tees on your supply copper (1/2 sweat x 1/2 sweat x 1/2 F-NPT) and use any horizontal approved arrestor.
Paul
The “hose bibb vacuum breaker” seem to be relatively cheap and the installation is very straighfoward. I found the following online:

EZ-FLO Hose Bibb Anti-Siphon Vacuum Breaker, Brass Plumbing Fitting, 20199 - Amazon.com

Does this one look like a good choice?

Yeah, looking in hindsight I believe that sometimes it makes a bang sound for a brief moment when it starts to fill the cylinder with water. I will try to the nylon tie trick for now!

Once, I installed a water hammer arrestor for a refrigerator water line to help protect the solenoid. But that was a long time ago…

I am not too far away from you (Lansing, MI); so, maybe it is required here as well.

In the near future I plan on install an arrestor for the water lines going to the washing machine. Using tees and a 1/2 sweat x 1/2 sweat x 1/2 F-NPT along with a thread copper arrestor (the seem to be less expensive) seems to be a good approach!

Thanks!
 
The only question I would have is inputting the appliance to the wall, because in direct proximity could hold the appliance 4"+ from the wall, and could lead to lost clothing either in parts of pairs, or items.

Sorry, I don't quite understand. What do you mean by "inputting the appliance to the wall"?

One thing I was considering is to somehow anchor the washing machine to the concrete floor or put pads below the machine legs to avert any possible damage in case the machine goes rogue -- start shaking, banging and waking around and then hit the pvc sewer line that is nearby, which would be very problematic to say the least.
 
Back
Top