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How can remove rust from this meat grinder in a food-safe way?

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ilyaz

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Is there a chemical way to remove rust from all parts of this vintage meat grinder so that I can use it afterwards for its intended purpose? I prefer to avoid having to sand them by hand. TIA

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Snoonyb

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If your interest is just to shine it up, then use some 3 or 4 "0" steel wool and 10 weight motor oil, the petina will eventually return.
 

JoeD

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I would not use motor oil if you intend to use it to grind meat,
 

ilyaz

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"for its intended purpose" - so yes I want to use it to grind meat

I soaked it in white vinegar overnight. Didn't remove much rust although there wasn't too much to begin with. Planning to wash it once in dishwasher and see how it looks afterwards.

Is there a way to season it similar to how cast iron skillets are seasoned?

And am I crazy or is it true that, unlike a lot of other stuff, rust is actually not particularly bad if a bit of it gets into meat? That is, if a bit of rust remains and it gets removed by the meat it's not the end of the world?
 

bud16415

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"for its intended purpose" - so yes I want to use it to grind meat

I soaked it in white vinegar overnight. Didn't remove much rust although there wasn't too much to begin with. Planning to wash it once in dishwasher and see how it looks afterwards.

Is there a way to season it similar to how cast iron skillets are seasoned?

And am I crazy or is it true that, unlike a lot of other stuff, rust is actually not particularly bad if a bit of it gets into meat? That is, if a bit of rust remains and it gets removed by the meat it's not the end of the world?
it is not a big deal. I would rather add a little iron to my diet than a little Teflon.

My grandma always said you have to eat a peck of dirt before you die. I thought that was quite a bit but now hitting 65 I sometimes wonder how close I am. :coffee:
 

Snoonyb

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it is not a big deal. I would rather add a little iron to my diet than a little Teflon.

My grandma always said you have to eat a peck of dirt before you die. I thought that was quite a bit but now hitting 65 I sometimes wonder how close I am. :coffee:

Too which?o_O
 

Flyover

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I guess you could season it exactly like a cast iron skillet: rub some high-smokepoint food-safe oil all over it (rapeseed? coconut?) and pop it in the oven for hours and hours, then take it out and rinse & repeat for like a whole day... But personally I agree with Bud about getting a little iron in my diet.

Think about it like this: humans lived for hundreds of thousands of years out on the African Savannah, eating whatever we could find, often right off the ground. If our digestive systems couldn't handle a bit of dirt and trace metals, we would not have survived.
 

Bob Reynolds

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You could possibly bead blast it with glass beads or walnut shells to clean it up. I would want to be careful that you don't pit the metal.

As far as using oil, you can use any food grade vegetable oil to wipe it down or season it.
 

Snoonyb

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Interestingly, I, purposely, omitted the, common sence step, that anyone who has EVER cleaned a kitchen appliance does, THEY WASH THEM WITH SOAP AND WATER.

Or, maybe, I'm the exception.
 

JoeD

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To remove the rust I would start with a scotch bright scouring pad or fine sand paper. Then wash and spray with vegetable oil or pam between uses to prevent more rust.
 

mabloodhound

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the vinegar would have removed all the rust; so just wash it and dry it real good.
 

ajaynejr

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Bake the disassembled parts (excluding the handle if wood) in the oven at about 300 degrees for at least a half hour and it will be sterilized free of tetanus and all those nasty germs associated with rusty objects.

Caution: Give it time to cool down when done. The heavy metal parts will stay hot longer than the oven grilles.

The baking can be done before or after your final sanding using steel wool, sandpaper, etc. and before or after you do your final washing prior to use.
 
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Graybeard

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When I was restoring old machines I used electrolysis. Works amazingly well.
 

mabloodhound

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Do NOT sandblast it....that would leave a pourous finish. The rust removed by the vinegar is all that was needed. A light coat of mineral oil and all is OK. Go ahead and use it.
 
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