how much does block concrete fence cost?

Discussion in 'Bricks, Masonry and Concrete' started by ann123, Apr 23, 2014.

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  1. Apr 23, 2014 #1

    ann123

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    425 ft long and 6 ft high.

    Was given ridiculously high quotes - about 50 k (labor and material).

    Did some research and it seems like it should be around 10-15k.

    But can't find anyone in Louisiana with that price.


    Any suggestions? What's the fair price for that kind of job?


    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Apr 24, 2014 #2

    oldognewtrick

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    First off Ann, :welcome: to House Repair Talk.

    50k to much? I don't know, it might not be enough. What type of soil conditions do you have? Is there a footer there already or are they going to have to pour a new one? And who said 10-15 is a fair price? Are they willing to do it for that?

    I know, a lot of questions. We're more than happy to help, but trying to guess a price is like guessing how long is a string.
     
  3. Apr 24, 2014 #3

    Wuzzat?

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    http://www.homewyse.com/services/cost_to_install_concrete_block_wall.html
    For a place in NJ where the median household income is $68K and with 2550 sf of wall I get ~$25K.

    For New Orleans, Estimated median household income in 2011: $35,041 so you'd pay 35 x 25K/68 = ~$13K.
    http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q="new+orleans"+city+data&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
    but you should reuse the calculators with your own ZIPcode.
    http://www.google.com/search?client...rete+block+fence+calculator&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
  4. Apr 24, 2014 #4

    guyod

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    That site does not say anything about a footer. I dont know what the frost line in louisiana is but 425ft of footer plus block to get up to grade will easily cost 10k-15k extra.
     
  5. Apr 24, 2014 #5

    Wuzzat?

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  6. Apr 24, 2014 #6

    guyod

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    That chart is way off for me. Most of PA is 36" or below. Chart say most of PA is 20"
     
  7. Apr 24, 2014 #7

    mudmixer

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    In LA, the footing cost may not be cheap. The frost is not factor, but the soils can be so horrible that the footings for 6' high privacy wall the cost goes up because of the history of winds that will tip it over easily. In NO and along the river, the mucky soil, water and possible winds make it difficult. If it does blow over, put some horizontal steel in it so it can be used as a sidewalk later.

    Dick
     
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  8. Apr 24, 2014 #8

    ann123

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    Here are some details:


    425 feet long, the height = 6 ft

    60 feet of the wall will be higher - 8 ft.

    22 feet will be brick (to match the house at front).

    6 ft gate at back side.


    Important: water should drain well through



    There is no footer, so they'll probably need to pour a new one. Don't know about soil condition. Right now it's a yard with grass on it, it was a new construction site..

    As for 10-15k.. It's per different calculators found on the web.. and per common sense. I don't believe it should cost that much. Unless they're trying to bill us $500.00 per hour... But maybe I am wrong; that's why I created this thread.;)
     
  9. Apr 24, 2014 #9

    nealtw

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    I don't know if you need permits for that or not but the city inspectors are a good source of information. They will know something about soil conditions and have some idea about what you might need for a footer. Up here we would be sent straight to an engineer.
    It's always best to know what you need so you dictate how it will be done before you get quotes. Otherwise you will get quotes with different plans so you can't compare them.
    Then come back and see what people here think of the plan.
     
  10. Apr 24, 2014 #10

    Wuzzat?

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    It seems to understate for my area, too.
    20" might be the depth reached half the time, with 3' being that reached less than 10% of the time.
     
  11. Apr 24, 2014 #11

    bud16415

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    I don’t know about the calculators and how the formula works they are based on, I’m sure part math and part tables.

    You need to take into account each task you will be asking for and materials. Basically you need 4300 blocks and about 14 yards of footer. Price it out. You will need a survey of some kind and excavation wide enough to get in and form the footer, base material may need to be added and compacted, and build maybe 4 course of blocks below grade. You will have a cost for forms, rebar, pouring and finishing. Depending on access you have to figure how the material is getting back there. Will it have to be pumped or carted back etc. then you will have a cost per block to lay. And a cost to finish the wall. Will it be capped and painted. Coated or left to look like block. It then has to be all back filled excess material removed and cleaned up.

    It’s a bigger project than one may think. I would get as many quotes as I could and have each one tell you exactly what their plan is. Or better yet get the plan figured in advance and then have everyone quote to what you expect it to be.
     
  12. Apr 24, 2014 #12

    Wuzzat?

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    What are reasonable upper limits the OP should pay for this, all things considered?
     
  13. Apr 24, 2014 #13

    nealtw

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    Exactly the amount they write the check for.
     
  14. Apr 25, 2014 #14

    Wuzzat?

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    I'll rephrase the question, your honor. . .:D

    Does anyone besides the OP feel that $50k is too much for this job?
     
  15. Apr 25, 2014 #15

    havasu

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    I feel it is too much. Problem is, there is no exact details what they plan on doing to justify this expenditure.
     
  16. Apr 25, 2014 #16

    bud16415

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    Is it too much? I don’t know.

    I can tell you I would never pay 50k for a fence of any kind.

    I think Neal’s conjecture is the amount people will charge and or pay is subject to many factors some of them measurable and tangible, others not so much. The richest person on earth might not think twice spending 100 times that on his security or privacy. A contractor with several years of backlog might double his price to make it worth it if the consumer really needs it bad enough. In my last post I more or less itemized what would go into this job and someone could price that all out and take a swag at the labor and equipment costs. I don’t know maybe 5 minutes to lay one block that’s 358 man hours assuming we get some really cheap labor at $20 per hour that’s over $7,000 right there. I know a block layer can go faster and I also know the labor cost is more like $60 to $100 per hour most likely. I don’t know what a block costs but a look on line could itemize all the hard stuff.

    I just bought 40 poles for $1.50 each to use for a fence I’m building.
     
  17. Apr 25, 2014 #17

    havasu

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    I do know locally there are many cheaper alternatives to build a fence. My local big box store sells ready built 6' tall fencing, in everything from wood, to PVC, metal and other materials. With a $50K price, I myself would be looking at all the alternatives, along with at least two other bids from the specific area.
     
  18. Apr 25, 2014 #18

    mudmixer

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    Without any real details like like location, site access, soil type, depth to water, it could be a bargain or too high.

    The footing could be 8" to 12" thick and 18" to 48" wide, the wall could be 6" or 8" thick with or without pilasters if it not on piling. I have seen some walls that had poor access so excavated and replacement soil had to be wheeled in and out and footing concrete pumped over the roof of the home.

    In any event, the wall will have to be reinforced (16" to 48" on centers).

    A common privacy wall in southern CA or AZ is 6" high with reinforcement at 24" o.c. and 24" wide (minimum) footing 8" thick with the bottom of the footing about 2' down. - That is for reasonably good soil. Going up to 8' high gets much costlier because of the wall design and overturning from wind.

    If it is on or abutting a neighbor, the cost goes up.

    Dick
     
  19. Apr 25, 2014 #19

    havasu

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    Well said Dick!
     
  20. Apr 25, 2014 #20

    nealtw

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    Like Dick pointed out, there are to many unknowns.

    The OP can get three of four quote from contractors with their different plans and then try to sort out who has the best story and or price.

    Or the OP can have an engineer design the job and all the contractors get to quote the same job..

    In the end anything is worth what someone will pay for it.
     
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