How to Fix A Hole In Stucco Left By Plumbing Repair?

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RudisFL

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Hole.jpg Had to break through the stucco to repair a leak that was leading into the house.
The void is quite literally the size of the empty space in a cinder block.
What should I pack the hole with? I would prefer not to use spray foam.
 
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Snoonyb

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"Packing something" is not a good Idea because it will affect the repair.

If the stucco wire was cut and removed then you need to obtain some expanded metal lath and some roofing felt or kraft paper. Blend the kraft paper with the existing stucco paper, then add the metal lath and bind it too the stucco netting with tie wire, then apply the stucco patch material and blend to the existing texture.
 

RudisFL

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"Packing something" is not a good Idea because it will affect the repair.

If the stucco wire was cut and removed then you need to obtain some expanded metal lath and some roofing felt or kraft paper. Blend the kraft paper with the existing stucco paper, then add the metal lath and bind it too the stucco netting with tie wire, then apply the stucco patch material and blend to the existing texture.
I'm in Florida, it is a cinder block frame with a stucco exterior.
There is no wire, there is no paper.

I'll attach wire to the sides of the hole so the cement has a base, but I feel like something should occupy the empty space? I'm considering fun noodle foam.
 

Snoonyb

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Or you could just place metal lath crumpled, into the cavity.

The photo was not present before my 1st response. So do not fill with crumpled lath.

Anything you use to fill the area be sure to sleeve the pipe. Chip the color coat back slightly so you get a good lap onto the CMU.

Another question; Is this the main water service for the dwelling?
 
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Gary

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Or build an access panel to cover it. You could make the access panel look like stucco or just something complimentary to the stucco wall. That way, should you need to do repairs in the future, you'll have non-destructive access.
 

RudisFL

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Or you could just place metal lath crumpled, into the cavity.

The photo was not present before my 1st response. So do not fill with crumpled lath.

Anything you use to fill the area be sure to sleeve the pipe. Chip the color coat back slightly so you get a good lap onto the CMU.

Another question; Is this the main water service for the dwelling?
Yes, main line into the house.

What is an acceptable sleeve? Can I split a large piece of PVC over it?
 

RudisFL

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Or build an access panel to cover it. You could make the access panel look like stucco or just something complimentary to the stucco wall. That way, should you need to do repairs in the future, you'll have non-destructive access.
That's more work than I'm looking to do!
Truth is I'll most likely never go back to that spot again. A leak will find a new weak spot somewhere else.
 

Snoonyb

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Yes, main line into the house.
This would be very disconcerting to me, because using the material that was, for the repair, could well have eliminated an electrical ground, your copper piping.

I'll ask you for another photo, or 2, or 3.

Open the weather cover on your electrical service panel and take a photo of the breakers, and another photo of a hose bib near buy and another of and heavy metal wrapped connection to a metal rod driven into the ground.

What is an acceptable sleeve? Can I split a large piece of PVC over it?
Yes, preferably just large enough to encompass the repair fittings.
 

RudisFL

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This would be very disconcerting to me, because using the material that was, for the repair, could well have eliminated an electrical ground, your copper piping.

I'll ask you for another photo, or 2, or 3.

Open the weather cover on your electrical service panel and take a photo of the breakers, and another photo of a hose bib near buy and another of and heavy metal wrapped connection to a metal rod driven into the ground.



Yes, preferably just large enough to encompass the repair fittings.
The electrical ground is on another bib.
 

Snoonyb

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And connected to the copper piping system which no longer exists because of the material used to effect the repair placed a non-conductive element in the system.

I would have demanded the repair be accomplished with like material.

There is an alternative and that is too drive another ground rod a min. of 7' away from the existing ground connection and connect the two ground connections with #6 armored cable.
 

RudisFL

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And connected to the copper piping system which no longer exists because of the material used to effect the repair placed a non-conductive element in the system.

I would have demanded the repair be accomplished with like material.

There is an alternative and that is too drive another ground rod a min. of 7' away from the existing ground connection and connect the two ground connections with #6 armored cable.
Thanks. The house has already has ground rod.
 
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