How to get a 10mm without a 10mm drill bit.

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InTooDeep

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This has been driving me crazy. I bought an IKEA stainless steel sink without a pre-drilled faucet hole. I then bought a tool from IKEA in order to make the faucet hole but it requires a 10mm drill bit.

I drilled a 3/8 hole thinking it would be close enough but it's just too small.

I've been looking everywhere for a 10mm bit, but I can't find anywhere that sells metric bits. I live in Canada.
Any ideas on how to enlarge the hole slightly or places in Canada where I could get a 10mm bit.

Don't understand how a company like IKEA could sell a product that requires a tool that can't be bought.
 

beachguy005

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All of Canada and the internet, and you can't find a 10mm bit?
 

InTooDeep

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Internet yes. But I don't have a kitchen sink right now and would like to get one working asap.
Canada is metric except for tools. It's weird. I've been to every major hardware store and they don't have them.

I'll give that a short frodo. Also debating whether to just hammer it into a 3/8 hole.
 

joecaption

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10 MM is .328
3/8 is .375 how can it be to small?
Never once have seen a faucet that needed a 10mm hole.
Good luck trying to drill a hole in a sink with a drill bit.
Should be using a step drill.
Got a picture of this sink?
Nothing against Ikea but they sell some off the wall goofy stuff.
There's been hundreds of post about there strange plumbing and electrical stuff.
 

InTooDeep

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10mm is 0.393; so slightly larger. The 10mm is not the actual faucet hole. It's the hole required to get the cutting tool in to make the actual hole.

Agree about IKEA though. They seem to be on their own world sometimes.
 
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bud16415

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Being a tool and die maker by trade I don't believe I'm going to agree with the above post but I am. Just stick that .375 drill in there and rock the drill around and "bag" the hole out till the other tool fits. Go slow as to not snap the bit. A drill is designed to cut with the end only but the flutes will scrape away some material like a mill cutter in relatively thin material.

They also sell burr tools that can be chucked in a drill and you can wobble them around to open up a hole. Another method is a rat tail file.


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InTooDeep

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Did it! The swivel around the hole plus a little force with a hammer worked like a charm. The IKEA tool worked great too once I could get it in. Faucet is installed. Thanks guys
 

frodo

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10mm is 393 inches--a little over 3/8". Direct Conversion Formula10 mm * 1 in 25.4 mm = 0.3937007874 in

glad it worked out. been there,
 

frodo

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Did it! The swivel around the hole plus a little force with a hammer worked like a charm. The IKEA tool worked great too once I could get it in. Faucet is installed. Thanks guys

the word is wallered, wallered, pronounced wall-erd not swiveled.

I am gonna get you Canadians to speak southern, i its last thang, or onlyest thang
we accomplish around here. :rofl:
 

bud16415

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the word is wallered, wallered, pronounced wall-erd not swiveled.

I am gonna get you Canadians to speak southern, i its last thang, or onlyest thang
we accomplish around here. :rofl:

Up here it’s called being a “Shoemaker”.
 

frodo

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Up here it’s called being a “Shoemaker”.
down here a shoemaker makes saddles, boots, harness for a horse
we call him a leather worker or currier

i guess a shoemaker is a "McGuyver" of sorts?
 

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