humidifier operating?

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by mukarakaplan, Jan 31, 2018.

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  1. Jan 31, 2018 #1

    mukarakaplan

    mukarakaplan

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    I have an old Aprilaire Model 440 humidifier with an old control panel that has a dial set at 25. No leds/lights or screens/monitors to check if the humidifier is actually operating or not. How can I check if it is really working and everything is fine with it, or if it needs tuning? I've attached some images of it.

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  2. Feb 1, 2018 #2

    oldognewtrick

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    Check the humidity level in your home, what is the reading?
     
  3. Feb 1, 2018 #3

    mukarakaplan

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    I don't have a humidity monitor or hygrometer to check what the actual humidity level is. I can buy one if it is really the only way to tell that the humidifier is really working. After checking the humidifier again, I saw that it is leaking now around where the water pipe enters the humidifier. Is this normal?

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  4. Feb 1, 2018 #4

    jeffmattero76

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    I have two furnaces with two similar humidifiers and two similar humidistats. With the furnace off, slowly move the dial on the humidifier from off towards 45 and listen for a "click". That will give you a rough idea of what the humidity is in the house.

    To see if the humidifier is working, turn the thermostat to a higher setting than the room temperature so that the furnace goes on. Turn the humidistat to the maximum. Stand near the humidifier. When the furnace blower kicks on to circulation heated air to the living space, you should hear the water going into the humidifier, and, since the humidifier works by pouring water over an evaporator pad, you should see water coming out of the bottom of the humidifier going to a drain, or to a condensate pump. If that is not happening, make sure your water valve is open. You may want to open and close it a few times, especially if it is a saddle valves. As far as the leaking ice concerned, one of mine does that, and, the last I checked, replacing the part (solenoid valve i think) would cost almost as much as a new humidifier. Therefore, I only use one of mine.
     
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  5. Feb 1, 2018 #5

    aNYCdb

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    I don't know if its normal, but leaking water would be a sign that it is gathering condensation out of the air. The surest sign that it's working is that its generating water, which is appears gets pumped out somewhere. If there is a catch bin that the water goes into initially or you can see where that copper pipe ends that would be the easiest way to tell if its working.
     
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  6. Feb 2, 2018 #6

    bud16415

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    The unit is a humidifier not a dehumidifier, so its function is taking water and putting it into the dry air caused by combustion and generally cold winter air that gets dry.

    So I would say water leaking is a problem with the supply water line or valve or drip pan in the event more water is being released than can be absorbed into the air.
     
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  7. Feb 2, 2018 #7

    aNYCdb

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    Ha, that's what I get for living where it has never been too dry ever... I didn't even realize there was such a thing outside of the context of a sick child.
     
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  8. Feb 2, 2018 #8

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Ya when it gets –30f here and the wind is blowing down from Canada across 100 miles of frozen lake it manages to ring out most of the moisture here. We are old school and just set pans of water on the floor heat grates and it helps a lot.

    I have a friend who’s house sits on the bluff facing Lake Erie he built as building open on both ends facing the lake and he stacks rough cut wood in it in the fall with sticks between it for air flow. Come spring it is kiln dried without heat. He is a wood carver and he dries basswood and supplies it to all his carving friends. I gather they need it really dry to prevent cracks.
     
  9. Feb 6, 2018 #9

    aNYCdb

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