Installing separate toe kick pedestals under tall kitchen cabinets

Discussion in 'Carpentry and Woodworking' started by latelifebiker, Mar 24, 2014.

  1. Mar 24, 2014 #1

    latelifebiker

    latelifebiker

    latelifebiker

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    Among the replacement kitchen cabinets we ordered from Thomasville are two tall (92") storage units. They're 12" deep and 36" wide, to be used as shallow pantries. The cabinets ship with separate pedestal platforms to fit under them and create the toe kick at the bottom. My guess is that if the cabinets came fully assembled with the toe kicks attached it would be impossible to stand them upright in a room with 8-ft. ceilings.
    My uncertainty lies in the fact that the 5.25"-deep pedestals measure 8" X 31.5" when laid on the floor. I presume the intention is that I should mount them inside the box walls but pushed all the way to the back and all the way to one side to give me about 4.5" of toe kick across the front and on one side. I guess the cabinet floor is to carry the weight of the structure (with the help of wall screws, of course).
    Now HERE's my question: If I want the toe kick to appear ONLY on the front and not on either side, should I center the pedestal, block the corners and finish it off with a toe kick skin across the full recessed width and flush sides?
    And while I'm at it, should I support the two sidewalls with plywood extensions that rest on the floor?
    It seems logical, but I've never dealt with this two piece design, and I want to get it right.
    Thanks for any guidance. -llb
     
  2. Mar 24, 2014 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The scews in the wall will carry most of the weight just like the upper cupboards. So make sure you find studs and don't be cheap with the screws and put the base where it looks right, it will be fine.
    If they thout the sides should be supported they would have built it full width.
     
  3. Mar 24, 2014 #3

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Neal's point is important. DO NOT use drywall screws because they can shear off. Use quality steel screws and you MUST hit the studs to carry the load. This is particularly important for uppers but its also applies to the base and pantry cabinets too.

    http://www.quickscrews.com/catalog/cabinet-assembly-screws?gclid=CIni-uesq70CFQ5qfgodVjAA6Q

    Here is a basic primer ... screws discussed at 3:50 ...
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRwbLtSHKPU[/ame]
     
  4. Mar 24, 2014 #4

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I don’t see any harm in making it over kill even. If I was doing it I would add to the base as you were thinking. The screws into the wall are good also but personally I would rather see these big ones firmly on the floor. We have a 24 x24 full height panty. In our kitchen and I would hate to guess how much weight is packed in that thing. It is solid cans almost. More is better in this case if you ask me.

    When I put ours in I attached all the units together like you do and then ran a base board under them all with shoe. The only place I made it in sections was at the dishwasher for removal.
     

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