Is there fill to allow screw for sash lock?

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rokosz

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A recenrt post of mine asked about some woodwork on a window. Same window different concern now. this particular sash had a second, different lock installed on it. I intend to replace it with one that matches two other sibling windows. The problem is the 4 holes are very close and kind of worn. I want to fill the area with something that can take and hold a screw. I'm going/expect to be using Bondo wood filler for superficial blemishes but am not sure it will hold a screw. Maybe it will? Is drilling the same as screwing? drilling pipes material out of the way, screws make their own room right?. craaack.

3M site: Once dried, it can be sanded, shaped, planed, drilled, routed or sawed just like wood Anybody ever use it or have used a reliable alternative?
 

Eddie_T

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I haven't used the 3M but think I would trust it if I pre-drilled the screw holes just a little smaller than the screws.

Not being there another approach might be to drill holes for glued ⅜" dowels from the front so that screws from the top are biting into the long grain of the dowels. I would still pre-drill screw holes. The dowel ends would have to be filled, sanded and painted to disappear.
 

joecaption

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A picture would be nice to see what your dealing with.
Why not just move it over at least 3/8" and drill new holes?
 

Bob Reynolds

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I'm always mixed white glue or carpenters glue with sawdust and filled the holes. It will hold them.
 

Steve123

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The Bondo won't hold a screw very well.

Picture would help, but I don't see why gluing in a few tothpicks wouldn't work. Or, you can drill a hole, say 3/8", and then glue in a 3/8" wood dowel.
 

Eddie_T

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I have poked steel wool into holes, also toothpicks and wood glue. Toothpicks are pretty soft but they deform and the wood glue hardens them into the threads. The end grain of dowels would probably hold OK but I might pre-drill and add some wood glue to harden threads.

A lot of choices just grab one and go for it.
 

Jeff Handy

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I use tooth picks and wood glue.
Round wooden toothpicks dipped in glue work perfectly.
Push them deep into the old hole and snap off the extra.
Then push in more, until no more can fit.
Cut off the excess sticking out with a razor knife or sharp chisel.
Wait a few hours to dry.
As good as new.
If you are in a hurry, you can usually put a screw right into that newly packed hole, it will set and dry right around the new screw.
 

mabloodhound

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The round toothpicks are made from a hardwood and work perfectly as said above.
 

rokosz

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Hi all and thank you all. I attached a top-down pic of the sash meet. I've often used toothpicks to beef up a hole, your comments reminded me of that. Then I took the pic and see how _much_ of a hole needs to be beefed. I kinda like the idea of hardwood picks (or bits I've got lying around and stuffing them tight in glue). The dowel drill out is likely going to challenge my skills too much: drilling close to an edge, straight in from the side or top, and remembering the screws that hold the lock are only 5/8". So the pick/glue jam is my choice. Heck if it fails I'll be forced to reevaluate.
I considered not even bothering with sash locks - really, who is it going to keep out? But then I remembered the sash lock does a lot for compressing the upper, lower and meet weather stripping...
 

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Jeff Handy

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Those will all fill up fine with toothpicks.
Those wider slots, start filling with just the thick straight middle shafts.
Then jam in a bunch of the pointy tips, to pack it all tight.
You could also cut a piece off from near the tip of a hardwood shim, like you would use for hanging a door.
But toothpicks will end up stronger.
And once dry, will hold a screw better.
Shims and other wood scraps tend to split.
 
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rokosz

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Thanks for the confidence boost Mr. JH. and I really like the idea on the rounds n tips!
 

bud16415

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My dad would just pull out his penknife and whittle a plug fit for each hole and then use a little white/yellow wood glue on it. Hammer it in and trim it off.
 

Jeff Handy

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bud is right, that would work fine too.

But I am lazy, and have nicked my finger a few times doing that.
A razor knife makes a cut that bleeds like a son of a gun.

More than once, I have shaved a thick slice off the edge of a nearby 2 x 4 and tapped it into a hole, just like you described.

When the people I am working for don’t have any toothpick, haha.
 

zannej

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I was just going to say small dowels might work too, but Eddie beat me to it. Dowels, tooth picks-- whatever works.
Hopefully you'll get it fixed.
 

MrMiz

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+1 for bamboo skewers and Chopsticks. I use those when I feel like it would take too many toothpicks. I also saw a video recently where somebody used Bondo as long as you paint over it or try and match the wood color but I've never tried it.
 

BuzzLOL

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I mix up a few drops of fibreglas, drop it into the holes, then add the locks and push the screws in, hardens in a few hours... lasts 50 years or so... moisture resistant... would need to re-drill if holes don't line up... 2 part 5 minute or regular epoxy and glued pieces of wood is also fine...
 

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