Need pro advice-Bottom mount sink granite countertop issue/question

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by Billbill84, Oct 13, 2019.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Oct 13, 2019 #1

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    IMG_0475.JPG IMG_0476.JPG IMG_0477.JPG Hey guys! So I bought this house in January and I noticed right away the grime in the small gap between the bottom mount sink and underneath the countertop so I cleaned all that out and recaulked it. I was curious as to what's holding the heavy slate sink it can't be glue. I looked under the sink and saw these brackets with 3 long lifting screws on each side of sink that are doing the job and most were loose! So I grabbed a nut driver and torqued them up a little being very careful not to over tighten as it could break the countertop, right? So I check them every few weeks and today two were again! Prob from the house shifting and/or vibration from the garbage disposal.
    How tight should I get them I'm scared I'll bust the granite tops, and how can I prevent them from ever coming loose again? I thought about installing some jam nuts but there's really not much room and not sure if there's a deep enough socket given the length of the screws. I need to find a solution. Thx
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2019
  2. Oct 13, 2019 #2

    pjones

    pjones

    pjones

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2018
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    64
    Location:
    Vancouver Canada BC
    I’m not a plumber but I would reach for the blue thread lock.
     
    Billbill84 and bud16415 like this.
  3. Oct 14, 2019 #3

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    Good idea and thanks for the suggestion. I didn't know they made thread lock goop. I'm not sure this would work though. There's gotta be a way to lock them screws in there. I know I'm not the only one in the world with these Sink Setter brand brackets. Maybe there's a ton of people who don't realize theirs are even loose under there lol
     
  4. Oct 15, 2019 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,649
    Likes Received:
    3,329
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    There is way but might be difficult where you are working.
    You put a nut on the bolt, adjust the bolt and then tighten the nut up to where it is threaded in and that will lock the threads so nothing can move.
    It is the same as using two nuts when you want to remove a stud.
     
    Billbill84 and billshack like this.
  5. Oct 15, 2019 #5

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    Thanks but I am aware of the jam nut technique but will not work here because there's no way to be able to tighten the jam nut against the bottom side of the bracket UNLESS, if I removed bolt, got about 50 small washers and then tightened the nut agaist the washers which would not only bring the nut out to a accessible distance but also would compress them washers against the bottom side of said bracket still having the same affect right?
     
    nealtw likes this.
  6. Oct 15, 2019 #6

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    Something like this! But im wondering if anyone would know the thread size of the bolts on the Sink Setter PW99-9 bracket system?
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Oct 15, 2019 #7

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Hearder of Turds

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    18
    Stop tightening the bolts! All you are doing us pulling out the brass grommets that are epoxies into the countertop. The clamps are only there to hold the sink until the silicone set up. Silicone is the only thing holding the sink up. That is it.
    If you feel the need to "fix" it build a wooden cradle underneath the sink. Attach the wood to the wall of the cabinet.
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  8. Oct 15, 2019 #8

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    It's not just supported with silicon it's a heavy sink and there aren't any brass grommets under the counter top that I can see. Are the grommets what secures the countertop to the cabinets? If so are these usually visible? I do however, see silicon under the countertop in the small joint between it and the cabinets top edge. Maybe that's all that holding the countertop on?
     
  9. Oct 15, 2019 #9

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Hearder of Turds

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    18
    Yes. Cast iron sinks can and are held in place by silicone. Counter top guys usually install them but occasionally plumber do also.

    I have reinstalled plenty of them. Silicone is a great adhesive and waterproofer.
    Again you can always build a cradle to support the sink from underneath.
    If the bolts are loosened up is there a gap between the sink and countertop?
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  10. Oct 15, 2019 #10

    billshack

    billshack

    billshack

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    26
    I agree with puddlesx5. I would disconnect the sink allow to drop down a small bit . and clean up as best you can between counter and sink . Make sure everything is 100% dry . them apply ultra clear silicone caulk. then tighten up bolts and put some sort of support under neath. clean up any excess caulk that comes out .
    then wait two days to make sure every thing is 100% dry and holding .
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  11. Oct 15, 2019 #11

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Hearder of Turds

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    18
    It is not that easy. The whole sink has to be taken out to replace the silicone. It takes me around 4 to 6 hours to do this. Remove plumbing remove sink remove ALL old silicone. Double check ALL old silicone is removed. Build cradle to support weight of sink . Apply silicone and hang sink. Wipe excess silicone reinstall plumbing. 2 days later remove cradle.
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  12. Oct 15, 2019 #12

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    I already did all this stuff cleaned out grime and recaulked with clear silicon. I'm not about to remove the whole sink and redo the recaulk job, for what? My issue is the
    Sink Setter brackets are coming loose after a couple months and I want the added support so I like them bolts snugged up a little and that's where my dilemma is at, that's it! Also, not every sink is held up with just silicon, if there's a "cast iron" sink the size of mine dangling with just silicon I'd bet within a couple years, at best, there will be some major issues requiring a complete clean up & reinstallation. This sink is made from a rock or slate-like material and its HEAVY! But that's besides the point lol
     
    nealtw likes this.
  13. Oct 15, 2019 #13

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Puddlesx5

    Hearder of Turds

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    18
    The first cast iron (33"x22") sink I reinstalled is from 2005 with no problems. Still hanging in there.
    Cleaning of both surfaces is what holds them together.
    For your problem you may want to enhance the existing brackets by building another structure to help with the load.
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  14. Oct 15, 2019 #14

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    Yeah that's what I'm thinking too. May even see about just blocking it in with a couple 2x4 pieces against the sides of the cabinet. With my luck, I'd probably never find an elongated spacer nut with the proper thread size as this would solve the issue
     
  15. Oct 16, 2019 #15

    pjones

    pjones

    pjones

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2018
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    64
    Location:
    Vancouver Canada BC
    Those are called coupling nuts. They come in a variety of sizes usually with thread pitches to match all thread stock. You might get lucky at the hardware store if you look hard enough.

    I recall a coworker of mine installing a similar sink and if I recall correctly his was just held up with silicone also.
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  16. Oct 16, 2019 #16

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    Yeah there's no doubt about silicon's strength but I want to lock them bolts into place so I don't have to rely on just the silicon because I'm also trying to wife-proof stuff in my house as well
     
  17. Oct 16, 2019 #17

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,649
    Likes Received:
    3,329
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    My buddy had a manufactures instruction was a 2x4 frame under the cast iron sink. That would have used up most of the space.
    We used 2 pieces of angle iron and held them in place with a piece white board that matched the material inside his cupboard. bill 1.png
     
    Billbill84 likes this.
  18. Oct 17, 2019 #18

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Billbill84

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2019
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Crown Point
    IMG_0538.JPG IMG_0539.JPG IMG_0540.JPG IMG_0541.JPG Thanks guys for all the suggestions & help. I think I solved this one...I've engineered an elongated bolt that I'd like to call coupler torque bolt lol. I applied the bolt lock/jam nut theory with an elongated aluminum tube to use as a compression spacer, and bring all adjustments within a workable area down lower. I built the bolts, installed them hand tight then torqued the compression nut. Still out of the way of storage too! Have a look
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 17, 2019
    nealtw likes this.

Share This Page