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New Cement Board or Just Tile

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jlombardi

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I have a home built in 1932. The main bathroom only has a bathtub with tile about two feet above the tub. I would like to install a shower head, tile the walls to the ceiling, and have the tub resurfaced. My question is do I have to gut the area around the tub and install cement board or can I get away with just removing the tile border and extending the tile to the ceiling?


 

CallMeVilla

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A 1932 house is probably plaster walled. That is not a good backer for tile. Additonally, your seam will not be watertight.

So, since you only have two feet to remove, I would demo the entire area to the ceiling (you want to go that high). Protect the tub from damage in the process. Install cement board (Hardie backer) and seal the entire area with a modern elastomeric coating (RedGard) which IS water tight. Then tile to your heart's desire.

Here is a basic run thru ....

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxNkHgkV834[/ame]
 

Snoonyb

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I have a home built in 1932. The main bathroom only has a bathtub with tile about two feet above the tub. I would like to install a shower head, tile the walls to the ceiling, and have the tub resurfaced. My question is do I have to gut the area around the tub and install cement board or can I get away with just removing the tile border and extending the tile to the ceiling?

Welcome.

However, there is an obvious illegal condition that exists and you should have been informed of and which should have been corrected prior to it being marketed.

That is, that the tub filler is below the tubs flood rim, which can result in grey water being introduced back into the potable water system, contaminating it.

The cure is relatively simple.

Re; your question.

What will determine the extent of the preparation, will be in determining the base the existing tile was placed over and you can easily ascertain this by removing one of the top trim tile and drilling through the wall material with a masonry bit.

Another method would be to disassemble the center, diverter stem on the faucet to see if you can identify the walls composition.

Are you familiar with gypsum plaster and the difference in its appearance from cement plaster, which should be the base material for tile?
 

kok328

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Any thoughts on a shower insert/surround?

Perhaps one where you don't have to loose that beautiful tub.
Porcelain coated cast iron? Don't make em' like that anymore.
 

jlombardi

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A 1932 house is probably plaster walled. That is not a good backer for tile. Additonally, your seam will not be watertight.

So, since you only have two feet to remove, I would demo the entire area to the ceiling (you want to go that high). Protect the tub from damage in the process. Install cement board (Hardie backer) and seal the entire area with a modern elastomeric coating (RedGard) which IS water tight. Then tile to your heart's desire.

Here is a basic run thru ....
Thank you for the video.

Welcome.

However, there is an obvious illegal condition that exists and you should have been informed of and which should have been corrected prior to it being marketed.

That is, that the tub filler is below the tubs flood rim, which can result in grey water being introduced back into the potable water system, contaminating it.

The cure is relatively simple.

Re; your question.

What will determine the extent of the preparation, will be in determining the base the existing tile was placed over and you can easily ascertain this by removing one of the top trim tile and drilling through the wall material with a masonry bit.

Another method would be to disassemble the center, diverter stem on the faucet to see if you can identify the walls composition.

Are you familiar with gypsum plaster and the difference in its appearance from cement plaster, which should be the base material for tile?
I am not entirely sure. But, I imagine I can do a google image search and find the answer.

Any thoughts on a shower insert/surround?

Perhaps one where you don't have to loose that beautiful tub.
Porcelain coated cast iron? Don't make em' like that anymore.
Yes, it is porcelain coated in cast iron! I also absolutely love the tub and want to keep it. I originally I thought I could just replacing the faucet with one that had a diverter and a side outlet. Then just adding a hand shower on a bar over the tile. But, I guess I would have to cover that outlet and instal the faucet above the tub? I am not exactly sure what I would do with the current faucet opening. I this is my first attempt at a bathroom remodel.

Thank you!
 

Snoonyb

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Thank you for the video.

I am not entirely sure. But, I imagine I can do a google image search and find the answer.
Gypsum plaster, which was the typical interior wall finishing product of that era is an off-white, coarse material that is easily crumbled, while cement plasters of that era are a light to medium grey, sand and cement material which provides a stable base for tile and could well have been painted, similar to your wall areas above the 3'2" tile wall surrounds you have now.

Tap on the wall above your tile, then walk to the hallway and tap there. If the sound is the same, you probably have gypsum plaster.

Yes, it is porcelain coated in cast iron! I also absolutely love the tub and want to keep it.
If you intend to accomplish the demo yourself there are measures to protect that fixture and if you are going to have this accomplished by others, make sure that provision is specifically stated in your agreement.

I originally I thought I could just replacing the faucet with one that had a diverter and a side outlet.
Tub faucets are available tub, shower, or tub/shower and the outlets in the valve body are orientated for that, bottom, top, or both.

Then just adding a hand shower on a bar over the tile. But, I guess I would have to cover that outlet and instal the faucet above the tub?
Your first reference is and was called an ALSONS and are now marketed by DELTA and GROHE as well as several others and was the legitimate method of retaining the tub, while raising the valve above the flood rim.

I am not exactly sure what I would do with the current faucet opening. I this is my first attempt at a bathroom remodel.
In your case you could do that, or because the tub diverter valve is already above the flood rim, raise the tub filler above the flood rim, and change the existing tub drain to the typical waste and overflow you see today.

Which can be done without damaging the tile.
 

slownsteady

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If you have access to the wall directly behind the tub, that would be beneficial. That's because you can get to the plumbing (if you need to ) without messing with the tiles.
 
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