Not overloading the generator

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bud16415

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IMO you have two options.



One is to isolate everything you will be needing temporary power to with its own outlet and plug and then run extension cords thru the home and pull those plugs and plug them into the gen. I believe this is what you are set up to do now.



The second way would be to use a proper transfer switch system where you pick out some number of circuits say six and then have a gen sized for those six circuits and when it is used there is a failsafe method of disconnecting from the power company and connecting part of your home to the gen.



Here is an example of one.



Reliance Controls 30 Amp 250-Volt 7500-Watt Non-Fuse 6-Circuit Transfer Switch Kit-3006HDK - The Home Depot



Doing any other method of homemade jumpers and needing to make sure power is disconnected manually is just asking for trouble. All you need is one mistake and you are going along fine and the power comes back on and there is a back feed, or worse yet someone from the utility gets electrocuted from your back feed working on the line. You could back feed to your neighbor and he may be running a gen also.

The best way is get a pro out and have him sort out your panel and possibly rewire some of your house so six of your circuits cover your main needs. For instance maybe you would like your microwave to work and refrigerator in the kitchen. Then furnace and water pump. Maybe TV or radio and internet and one light in each room. Your house may or may not be wired to suit this.
 

swimmer_spe

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Look up the specs for your generator, as a 240V machine it has a max amperage that is not to be exceeded. That amperage does not go up just because you are using 120V loads.

The 120V circuits are essentially branch circuits and shouldn't all be on the same leg of the 240V. Some neutral currents will cancel at the generator receptacle panel and those loads will be seen as 240V by the winding. If it has four 120v receptacles (two on each leg) the loads will have to be divided such that the maximum amperage at any individual receptacle or the sum of the four does not exceed the generator current rating.

That's the one I have. It is 11,500 peak watts.
 

Eddie_T

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That appears to be a nice generator. I would assume that the four 20A 120V outlets are paired so that the two on the left are on one leg and the two on the right the other. So when the specs say 76.6 amps at 120V it means 38.3A max on the left paired outlets and 38.3A on the right so effectively it's 38.3A @240V.

When using the supplied cord just remember that those outlets are paired with those on the generator and don't add additional current capability. I assume the cord is for the 30A locking outlet.
 

swimmer_spe

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That appears to be a nice generator. I would assume that the four 20A 120V outlets are paired so that the two on the left are on one leg and the two on the right the other. So when the specs say 76.6 amps at 120V it means 38.3A max on the left paired outlets and 38.3A on the right so effectively it's 38.3A @240V.

When using the supplied cord just remember that those outlets are paired with those on the generator and don't add additional current capability. I assume the cord is for the 30A locking outlet.
The cables have bee routed to specific things. None are overly high amperage, but they are all split around.
 

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