Overhead Garage Storage

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by bjmcgoo22, May 29, 2017.

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  1. May 29, 2017 #1

    bjmcgoo22

    bjmcgoo22

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    Hi all,

    I have built an over garage door storage rack using 2x4's, 2x10's, Unistrut and threaded rod.

    It's holding up really well but I notice after being up for a couple months that the 2x10s laying across the struts are starting to bow in the middle.

    I was wondering if I can just add another run of Unistrut in the middle BUT didn't know about tying in to the beam going across the middle of the ceiling. This beam (I beam??) only spans the garage. The inside of the downstairs has another beam going across the ceiling but isn't the same piece.

    See my pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/gXpEi

    (The garage door tracks are kinda in the way but you'll notice the 2x4s screwed into the ceiling with threaded rod going to unistrut holding 2x10s and 2x4 and a sheet of plywood).

    This is an attached garage with a second story above, 2x10 joists on 16".

    Thanks.
     
  2. May 29, 2017 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    If it is a steel beam you could drill it and tap it for a threaded rod or just add your support beside the beam about 4" away to avoid the hangers.
    If you think what you have will carry the load and you just want to stop any sag you could just add 2x4 to the side if the 2x you have up there in an L shape.
     
  3. May 29, 2017 #3

    Sparky617

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    Build a ladder frame out of 2x4's on standing them up 16" OC and then use OSB as the decking. You could keep most of the space above your unistrut support by bolting the 2x4 frames to the unistrut with the top flush with the top of the unistrut or adjust it as needed for space below the rack. Actually with a 2x4 ladder frame you wouldn't even need the unistrut if it was constructed properly.
     
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  4. May 29, 2017 #4

    bjmcgoo22

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    It isn't steel. It seems to be a 2x10?? Definitely wood.
     
  5. May 29, 2017 #5

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Then you could lag bolt into it, steel is often wrapped in wood to hang stuff off of it,
     
  6. May 29, 2017 #6

    bjmcgoo22

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    10-4, thanks for the info.
     
  7. May 29, 2017 #7

    Snoonyb

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    Another alternative would be to unload the platform, turn the 2x10's over and reload the platform.

    Kiln dried lumber is not moisture free, so, the drying process continues, and the load will cause the fibers to move as you've seen, in time that will cease.
     
  8. May 30, 2017 #8

    Sparky617

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    Or, turn them over, space them out and screw a layer of plywood or OSB to the 2x6's. Laying the 2x6's flat doesn't give them a lot of strength to resist bowing down over time. a 2x4 laid vertically would be stronger than the 2x6 laid flat. I like the ladder method mentioned in my post above, but screwing them to a layer of plywood or OSB would be a lot stronger than laying them flat with nothing connecting them.
     
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  9. May 30, 2017 #9

    Snoonyb

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    KISS principal, just trying to save the OP both time and money.
     
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  10. May 30, 2017 #10

    Sparky617

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    A sheet of OSB generally runs less than $10. A handful of drywall screws $1. I think just flipping them over won't solve the problem and he'll be unloading them yet again as they sag the other way.
     
  11. May 30, 2017 #11

    Snoonyb

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    Except that lumber drys and the fiber become less flexible, as I said "in time" resulting in a hardened inflexible member.

    Besides which, there is already a platform bridging the 2x10's, so the OSB would not be necessary, just a few screws.

    KISS principal.
     
  12. May 30, 2017 #12

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    So dry floor joists never sag when overloaded.?
     
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  13. May 30, 2017 #13

    Snoonyb

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    I give you some time to "think that thru" so you can rephrase it, in context.
     
  14. May 31, 2017 #14

    bjmcgoo22

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll give the turning them over and screwing down my plywood a try (I just have the plywood lying over the 2x10s as I wanted to test it out as proof of concept before screwing anything down).

    I tried letting the 2x10s dry out before using (4 weeks) but they could've still been a lil damp when I laid them out.

    I'll report back to give an update.
     
  15. May 31, 2017 #15

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    You clean your shoe, you stepped in the dodo.:nono:
     
  16. May 31, 2017 #16

    Snoonyb

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    The process can take years depending upon the relative humidity.
     
  17. May 31, 2017 #17

    Snoonyb

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    Spoken like a time-n-material guy.
     
  18. May 31, 2017 #18

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    What are you talking about. Should this man unload and dismantle the shelf every so many month and turn the lumber for years:clap:
     
  19. May 31, 2017 #19

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Remember, you're the one with all the experience, according to you, so, why would the aging of lumber be such a mystery, unless of course..........
     
  20. May 31, 2017 #20

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I think the OP wanted a storage shelf not a full time job flipping boards.
     

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