P-trap for a shower needed?

Help Support House Repair Talk:

drumz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2011
Messages
50
Reaction score
6
We remodeled 4 years ago and put in walk-in shower. The floor drain operates by water weight, a plate in the drain that keeps gases out simply lowers when a certain amount of water gets on top of it and it is fine, spring loaded and fool proof. The problem we are having is something is not vented correctly because an air pocket develops under the drain which doesn't allow it to open and drain. I have to lift the the cover and pull put the drain and then it burps a couple times and the drain works and I can return the drain and the cover. I do not have a drainage problem anywhere else in the house. It drains to my septic system by gravity and the shower goes from 2" into the 4" w/sweep (or maybe it's 1.5 into 3, I forget but it was done by a licensed plumber that's done good work for me over the years).
So my thought was because I have a crawlspace under the shower that maybe removing the glued in P-trap would solve my shower problem though the air pocket issue might still be there, I don't know. I have not been able to isolate what might be creating the air pocket. It is something that has just started happening too and I have not done anything to any other plumbing. I have a well and recently put in a new soft water system replacing an old and that is the only thing I've done but it's outside in the pump house so not sure what the deal is.
TIA for your time!
 

Attachments

Snoonyb

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
4,454
Reaction score
948
Sound like you may have some calcium build up, so, were it mine, I'd try some CLR.
 

drumz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2011
Messages
50
Reaction score
6
Sound like you may have some calcium build up, so, were it mine, I'd try some CLR.
Which sink would I dump it down, all of them? And it's safe for septic?
 

Eddie_T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Messages
730
Reaction score
507
I have no experience with these but suspect stiction in the flap mechanism rather than an air lock.

Is it this one?
 
Last edited:

Snoonyb

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
4,454
Reaction score
948
So, if you are under the impression that CLR's only application is sink drains, I suggest you brush-up on the container instructions=, C, calcium, L, lime, R, rust.
Poor some in the drain and work the mechanism. Sometimes it needs to soak, a bit. Then rinse.
 

drumz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2011
Messages
50
Reaction score
6
I have no experience with these but suspect stiction in the flap mechanism rather than an air lock.

Is it this one?
It is like that but much simpler.
But no, I pull that unit out and it doesn't drain for a bit and then starts to bubble and then drains. I have also stuck something down to force it open and it still needs to be removed. That was my first thought too.
 

drumz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2011
Messages
50
Reaction score
6
So, if you are under the impression that CLR's only application is sink drains, I suggest you brush-up on the container instructions=, C, calcium, L, lime, R, rust.
Poor some in the drain and work the mechanism. Sometimes it needs to soak, a bit. Then rinse.
Nothing is gunked up though. We clean the bathroom weekly. We have no traces of lime. If anything, we have an iron problem that I use iron soft water salt that helps with that.
 

Ron Van

Active Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2019
Messages
30
Reaction score
9
Location
Elk Grove, Ca., USA
A few questions… did this shower replace an existing tub or previous shower? Or is it a new addition? Did the drain ever work properly or was it like this when it was first installed?
 

drumz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2011
Messages
50
Reaction score
6
A few questions… did this shower replace an existing tub or previous shower? Or is it a new addition? Did the drain ever work properly or was it like this when it was first installed?
There was a tub there but the plumbing is all new, supple and waste. It has been fine, starting to suspect the drain itself.
Thanks!
 

Eddie_T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Messages
730
Reaction score
507
are these things legal?
I think some municipalities require them in apartment buildings to eliminate the possibility or your upstairs neighbor's sewage backing up into your drain. Or they can be used as dry traps.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
9
Reaction score
2
Location
Michigan
Was the tub drain 1 1/2" or 2" . My area tub drains are 1 1/2" and showers are 2". Depending on how far the run is it may be building up back pressure because the vent is not close enough.
 

zannej

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2014
Messages
2,695
Reaction score
927
Are you able to access the area with the P-trap to get pictures? It's entirely possible that the trap arm is not run properly or that there is no proper vent. It's also possible that the wrong size pipes may have been used.
 

drumz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2011
Messages
50
Reaction score
6
Was the tub drain 1 1/2" or 2" . My area tub drains are 1 1/2" and showers are 2". Depending on how far the run is it may be building up back pressure because the vent is not close enough.
Yes to the back pressure20210710_142555.jpg, and it is 2".
That's why I thought removing the trap (in the center of the pic and the only one) and replacing with a sweep would work better but then I see a long type p-trap when I look at diagrams of the HANEBATH 28-Inch Linear Shower Drain with Tile Insert Grate, Brushed Stainless. When I removed the drain mechanism bought in 2017 through Amazon (what they show now has a different drain mechanism, mine is all stainless and what I see now are plastic). So I might also see about getting a new drain, maybe they're improved.
 

zannej

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2014
Messages
2,695
Reaction score
927
Can you circle where the shower's drain is in that picture? I'm not sure which pipe is it. LOL. I have an idea, but am not certain.
 

Latest posts

Top