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Push-in wire connectors

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tomtheelder2020

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Bought a package of Ideal In-Sure push-in wire connectors for use installing LED lights in garage. The package says they can be used on #12 - #20 gauge wire. I am using 12 gauge FMC on a 15-amp circuit - because I already have some. My problem is that the #12 gauge wire will not insert into the connector. I tried cutting on a bias, hoping the angled cut would help, but still could not push it in. Is there some trick I don't know or is the manufacturer claiming something the product can't do? Thanks.
 

ctviggen

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They can be hard to get in. You really have to push sometimes. I've even had to hold the wire with pliers. (Don't recommend this, though, as this might damage the insulation.) Do you have any extra wire? Cut a bit and push in to see what the force required is. Another option is to (temporarily) bend the wire to give you more surface area on which to push.
 

bud16415

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Most wire cutters don’t shear the wire off they more or less pinch it off, and leave the end misshaped or with a burr.

Likely that is some of the problem. I have a wire cutter that I ground one side flat so I could get a square cut on one side of the wire. If you have an old cutter you could try that of buy a cheap one at harbor freight and alter it to cut square.
 

tomtheelder2020

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ctviggen, Pushing about as hard as I could the connect or would grab but the wire did not go in far enough to be visible and though it held airly well I was able to pull it aparat with less force than I used pushing it in. Even if it had gone in, no product should be this hard to use.
 

tomtheelder2020

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bud16415, I cut the wire on a bias because I thought the shape of the end might be part of the problem. However, based on you suggestion I tried again but this time I used a file to taper the wire end - and it slipped in easily. Thanks. for the nudge.
 

afjes_2016

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I use these because of arthritis in my fingers and twisting wires together properly and using a wire nut is getting more difficult for my fingers as they cramp up.
I don't have a problem with them and have used wire strippers (several ones I have), lineman pliers, long nose pliers etc to cut the wire (12 gauge) and don't have a problem. Just takes a bit of pressure to insert them in the ports. Sometimes you have to bend the wire on a 90 degree angle and push on the bend to apply enough pressure for the wire to go into the port hole.
 

ctviggen

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What I used to do also is rotate the connector while pushing down on the wire and pushing up (while rotating) on the connector. The problem is that this only works for the first wire. After that, it's possible to use this for the second wire, but tough. Forget about it for the third wire.

Try the rotating technique once and see what happens. Also, a "wiggling" technique can help, where you wiggle the connector from side to side while putting in the wire.

If all else fails, maybe you got a bad batch?
 

bud16415

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bud16415, I cut the wire on a bias because I thought the shape of the end might be part of the problem. However, based on you suggestion I tried again but this time I used a file to taper the wire end - and it slipped in easily. Thanks. for the nudge.
Glad I could help.



Regular wireman’s dykes have a bevel on both sided of the blade and pinch the wire off. Early on in my work life an old timer showed me how to take a regular pair of dykes and grind the one side flat for a clean cut as we were winding motor coils and had to weld the wires end to end in making a splice and needed a clean cut. I always kept those in my tool box when I needed a clean cut and used regular dykes for day to day wire cutting where it didn’t matter if the end was mangled.



I just looked and they now sell all kinds of flush cut wire cutters.



Here is one that popped up when I did a search.



Whizzotech Wire Cutter Diagonal Cutting Pliers Micro Flush cut Side cutters, 6 Inch - - Amazon.com

:thumb:
 

kok328

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I use these because of arthritis in my fingers and twisting wires together properly and using a wire nut is getting more difficult for my fingers as they cramp up.
I don't have a problem with them and have used wire strippers (several ones I have), lineman pliers, long nose pliers etc to cut the wire (12 gauge) and don't have a problem. Just takes a bit of pressure to insert them in the ports. Sometimes you have to bend the wire on a 90 degree angle and push on the bend to apply enough pressure for the wire to go into the port hole.
Good News, I purchased a package of Ideal wire nuts the other day and they now include a driver bit adapter to fit onto the wire nut. Starred shape like a torx, fits exact, better than a 5/16 nut driver.
 

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