Replacing exterior doors with rotted sills

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by zannej, Jun 6, 2017.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Sep 3, 2017 #41

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    Restoration & Renovations

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    76
    First, there is no reason to use PT lumber on an interior wall. I build all my headers using 2x8 with plywood sandwich glued up and nailed...much stronger than a single 4x4 post.
    As for tongue & groove plywood on a wall...it's not needed. I only use T&G on floors. And yes, plywood on a wall should be run horizontally for the best strength over 8'....less joints...unless you're just doing a patch.

    Dave Mason
     
    zannej likes this.
  2. Sep 4, 2017 #42

    zannej

    zannej

    zannej

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    593
    The header is on an exterior wall and I live in an area with extremely high humidity.

    The tongue and groove was intended for the floor-- not the walls. I plan to re-use some old wall panels for the wall material.

    When I was talking about the direction of the plywood, I meant for the floor as well. Hence the mention of joists instead of studs. :D

    I think my joists are 24" apart but they might not be a standard distance-- I won't know until I measure them and the weather hasn't been agreeable for doing so. I want to reinforce the floor under where I want to put a bathtub and the washer and dryer. I want to make sure it has sufficient support. I was thinking of the PT post for box joists under those areas.
     
  3. Jul 7, 2019 #43

    zannej

    zannej

    zannej

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    593
    I'm still procrastinating on this one. Since my last post a few things have happened. My friend's father & grandmother both passed away. He's working 2 jobs & works 6 days a week. On his 1 day off, he often gets roped in to fixing things for family members or friends so he doesn't get much rest.

    The back door has deteriorated more & the pet door fell apart & fell out of it. I purchased an 40"x40" awning to go over the door on the outside. It's got metal brackets with clear ABS for the "roof" part. It will allow light in but should deflect the rain. I'll just need to find a good way to anchor it & figure out the best way to put it up. But, I really need to replace the back door & may have to do it before replacing the subfloor. I'm wondering if I can just cut out the part where the threshold will be & put in some new lumber or composite material & install a plastic sill over some flashing tape (I want to make sure no water gets in). I am actually thinking of seeing if I can install a new header & adjust the cripples & king studs to make the top part level without removing the existing door so that I can get the awning up.

    When I do work on the floor, I'm thinking of using 1-1/8" cat PSI-9 tongue & groove plywood. It is supposed to work as a single layer subfloor. It will be heavy since it is so thick, but I will only need 4 sheets & won't have to worry about staggering the seams as much. I will probably have to sister the joists to make them level.
     
  4. Jul 8, 2019 #44

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,648
    Likes Received:
    3,329
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    If you do the door first and change the floor under it put 2x4 block on the flat under the seam to the old floor
    upload_2019-7-8_9-57-28.png
     
    zannej likes this.
  5. Jul 9, 2019 #45

    zannej

    zannej

    zannej

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    593
    Thanks, Neal! It's been too long since we've chatted. As always, I appreciate your help.
    A 2x4 sounds like a good idea. When I cut away the rotted part it should also let me see how thick the subfloor is. I really wish I hadn't procrastinated on this so long because prices for some things have gone way up.
     
    nealtw likes this.
  6. Jul 10, 2019 #46

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,648
    Likes Received:
    3,329
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    I would use two layers of plywood, when you cut out the old one with a circular, it keeps you 1 1/2" off the wall so you add the 2x4 blocks between the joists to make the connection with plywood the same thickness and then you cover both with the next one.
    On the side where you are going in the same direction as the joist, you need blocks to go from joist to the joist under the wall every 16" and then fill the gaps with the same 2x4 blocks.
    If the blue line is the old floor the red blocks are the 2x4s Zen 1.png
     
    zannej likes this.
  7. Jul 18, 2019 #47

    zannej

    zannej

    zannej

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    593
    I was actually thinking of using some 2x6s as reinforcement on the edge that will have the laundry appliances and bathtub. I may have to sister at least some of the joists to get the floor level because I know it slopes.
     
    nealtw likes this.

Share This Page