replacing studs

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by MichaelC, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. Jun 23, 2012 #1

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

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    I need to replace several studs (4X6 sandwiched between 2 2x6's) and part of the sill plate due to rot.
    Is there fault in my thinking that instead of going through the performance of jacking the ceiling while replacing the plate and studs just add two additional 4x6's adjacent to the existing studs and replace the originals at my leisure with no jacking of the ceiling?
     
  2. Jun 23, 2012 #2

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Better pics would help here. Are the new posts going to be on the outside of the framing or inside? There looks to be a drain line on the inside. How do you intend to attach the posts (thru bolts into a metal joining plate? Top nailed?)? What is on the bottom? (Footing with saddle? Just cement?)

    The issue of support is crucial. A post that large will need to be sledgehammered into place IF you do not jack the members above it slightly. You need very solid contact and fastening for something that beefy.

    More info would help with answers.
     
  3. Jun 24, 2012 #3

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

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    At the top of the studs I will remove the short 2x4 on the underside of the beam..pic 1
    I will sledge in 3-2x 6's...up against the first existing stud, leaving two to be fixed.
    I'll metal strap them to each other and to the underside of the beam
    and sill.
    Pic 2 shows the sill with a 1x2 edge strip.
    The new studs will be inside the framing.
    The sewage pipe is far enough away from the wall that it won't hinder any work.
    I will then remove the appropiate amount of wood from the two rotted studs. Then remove and replace the bad section of sill plate.
    Then replace the bottom sections of the studs and sister a 2x6 just to keep
    the joins honest...remove the temp studs and on to the next.

    stud.jpg

    stud2.jpg
     
  4. Jun 24, 2012 #4

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    SOunds like a well considered fix. As long as you get a tight fit on the new lumber, you may not need to jack the framing. I LIKE the sledge hammering. Cut your wood "fat" and give it a blast!
     
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  5. Jun 24, 2012 #5

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

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    Thank you for replying.....i'll keep you updated
     
  6. Jul 8, 2012 #6

    BridgeMan

    BridgeMan

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    Hope there's something left of those new studs that he's been sledge-hammering into place for the last 2 weeks.
     
  7. Jul 16, 2012 #7

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

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    Things are going well Bridgeman..the studs are just fine.
    I do have other things going on in my life so I haven't been rushing the job.
    Thanks for your continued support.
     
  8. Jul 18, 2012 #8

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    By the looks of the sheathing there's some issues you need to be addressing outside that building or your going to be doing more then just replacing studs.
     
  9. Jul 18, 2012 #9

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

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    You're correct. The sheathing has to be replaced to a height of ~3 ft.
     
  10. Jul 19, 2012 #10

    joecaption

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    Make it 2' that way one sheet can run 16'.
    The grades to high, no gutters, can cause the damage I see.
    Not addressed and you'll be doing this all over again.
    Post a picture of the outside area.
     
  11. Jul 20, 2012 #11

    MichaelC

    MichaelC

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    The grade was too high..it was causing basement seepage and, of course, the sheathing rot.
    I've had a backhoe in to lower the grade enough to keep the water problem under control but the house is on bedrock and I have rock very close to the wall so we're waiting for the rock drill to show up to give us room to properly fix the drainage.
     

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