Ripping cedar fence cap?

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soparklion11

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I'm building a cedar shadow box fence and I plan to add a cap onto that fence. Cap will be a 2x6" cedar board. I am considering cutting 2x6" cedar boards lengthwise at a 5 deg angle on both edges of the topside to create a pitch that will encourage water to drain off the top of the fence cap. It would look something like the "roof" piece on this Monopoly hotel: Cap Board "Roof"

I have access to a commercial-grade table saw. I haven't cut any boards on their short edge on a table saw. I realize that these cuts could be complicated if the boards are warped or cupped.

Is this "do-able"? I could also consider mounting uncut boards on a 5 deg angle, which would accomplish roughly the same drainage without being noticeable.

Or I could just screw them down and not bother with pitch at all.

Any thoughts are appreciated.
 

joecaption

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You need to cut the post tops at an angle, not the cap pieces.
Nothing complicated about it, set the blade at 5 deg. make a pencil mark right on the table, and use the mitre slide not the fence.
I'd cut the pieces 2" longer then the post is wide so there would be an over hang at the top and bottom.
 

Sparky617

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For the posts they make metal post caps. Reading the OP it looks to me like he's talking about the top board of the fence itself not the posts. I've ripped a board the length of the board using a table saw. Set the blade at 5 degrees and the blade height to have it reach the middle of the board. Run the one side through and then flip it and repeat. Feather boards will help keep the board tight against the fence.


 

soparklion11

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You need to cut the post tops at an angle, not the cap pieces.
Nothing complicated about it, set the blade at 5 deg. make a pencil mark right on the table, and use the mitre slide not the fence.
I'd cut the pieces 2" longer then the post is wide so there would be an over hang at the top and bottom.
I appreciate the reply. To clarify, I'd be fixing an uncut 2x6 to the top of the fence and having it sit at an angle rather than cut the actual 2x6 cap board? Thx
 

soparklion11

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For the posts they make metal post caps. Reading the OP it looks to me like he's talking about the top board of the fence itself not the posts. I've ripped a board the length of the board using a table saw. Set the blade at 5 degrees and the blade height to have it reach the middle of the board. Run the one side through and then flip it and repeat. Feather boards will help keep the board tight against the fence.
Thank you - I'll get some featherboards regardless.
So you think that cutting the entire board at a 5 degree angle will be a better solution than just mounting an uncut board on a 5 degree pitch?
 

bud16415

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I helped a guy at work make wood siding from flat boards. We had a good size band saw in the shop and he built a jig to push the board thru cutting it corner to corner. I had my doubts on how well this would work and we were going to do this at lunchtime. I was shocked how fast we cut a good size half a truckload up. Was way cheaper than buying siding and he couldn’t find a matching size to what he was replacing.

I have also done it on a table saw but with flipping it it is hard not to get a witness mark where the cuts meet.
 

Sparky617

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I helped a guy at work make wood siding from flat boards. We had a good size band saw in the shop and he built a jig to push the board thru cutting it corner to corner. I had my doubts on how well this would work and we were going to do this at lunchtime. I was shocked how fast we cut a good size half a truckload up. Was way cheaper than buying siding and he couldn’t find a matching size to what he was replacing.

I have also done it on a table saw but with flipping it it is hard not to get a witness mark where the cuts meet.

It depends on the look you're going for with the top board of the fence.
 

bud16415

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It depends on the look you're going for with the top board of the fence.
Yep with a single top board he could do a double angle with a little flat on the top. I was thinking a double top sloping both ways.
 

mabloodhound

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Your original plan is do-able. Just use a feather-board to keep it against the fence on the saw.
 

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