roofing options for enclosed patio

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by ckev70, Oct 17, 2019.

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  1. Oct 17, 2019 #1

    ckev70

    ckev70

    ckev70

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    I have an enclosed patio that is attached to the house. The current roofing material is corrugated fiberboard. Dimension is approx 18'l x32' w Roof has a sight pitch ...probably 4-6" for the total length. The roofing support is 4x4 wood with a 4 foot span. Horizontally there is probably 3 4x4 spanning the width.

    It's leaking during medium rain. What alternative roofing material can install. Not sure if I can put plywood sheeting and shingles due to load.

    Thanks
     
  2. Oct 18, 2019 #2

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    Can you post a pic of the support structure?
     
  3. Oct 18, 2019 #3

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Along with a photo your location is somewhat important? If the roof has to carry snow loading as it would here it could be underrated. When you say enclosed is it just screen or is it fully enclosed? Heated/AC?


    If the current roof that is failing is the corrugated fiber that has broke down over the years and I wanted something similar I would use corrugated steel roofing like they use on pole barns and such.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  4. Oct 18, 2019 #4

    ckev70

    ckev70

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    20191018_084220.jpg 20191018_073757.jpg 20191018_073804.jpg 20191018_073746.jpg Location: San Jose, CA
    It's attached to the main house. There are 8 large windows and glass slider and 2 doors exiting to yard. It's an unheated space.

    The highest point is 94" (connected to house) and slopes to 82" (farthest from house)
    Each window is approx 59"w x 57"h.

    Actual pictures might not be very useful but here they are. I've included a sketch as well.

    There is no decking under the corrugated fiber board. There is some insulation between the finished ceiling and fiberboard as well.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 19, 2019
  5. Oct 18, 2019 #5

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Well no worries about snow load then.


    That is a very unconventional method of framing a roof, at least around here.


    Assuming the pole supports is sufficiently strong enough to carry the weight of the roof structure now and the addition of some sheathing and roofing. I would add purlins 16” OC then sheathing and on top of that maybe something like a rubber membrane roofing system.


    I wonder if the room didn’t start off as just an open covered patio and along the way got closed in and made into a room.


    Some pros will be along shortly with more advice for you.
     
  6. Oct 18, 2019 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    corrugated fiberboard. Asbestos, cement??

    If you remove the crap above you could likely add rafters from above and make it a real roof. You could even work that higher on the house roof adding more pitch with out touching the interior finish.
     
  7. Oct 18, 2019 #7

    ckev70

    ckev70

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    yeah, this "enclosed patio" was built on the backyard aggregate slab which has issues as well. It's officially not a room due to the vast number of windows.
     
  8. Oct 19, 2019 #8

    slownsteady

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    I think the guys are right; if you are going to have a real room below, you should have a real roof above.
    But since you asked what other materials are available, you could check out Ondura corrugated roofing. I have no experience with it but I have seen it and it is thicker than plastic panels.....not really sure how much weight it applies.
     
  9. Oct 19, 2019 #9

    bud16415

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    The Ondura product is most likely what he had on there by his description. Many farmers have tried this stuff around here even as barn wall coverings and it shortly starts to fall apart as he described.


    It sounds like the OP is in a quandary as he has a finished room that was likely never permitted and if he goes for a full on roof system he may not have the structure to support it. If he seeks help with figuring out the structure or getting professionals involved permits will be applied for and he may well find out he needs to take the whole thing down and start over. What he had has worked for some time and it looks like it is not too bad of a room.


    The simplest fix as a DIY project would be steel agricultural corrugated roofing screwed down just like what he is taking off. It is not that expensive and will get him buy (40 years) and restore usage of the room. He will likely have trouble if he ever sells the house so I would factor in the likelihood of that with when he may be selling the house and just how much to spend on the fix.
     
  10. Oct 19, 2019 #10

    oldognewtrick

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    Do you know if there's any solid surface under the existing material? The problem with using agricultural panels is humidity will condensate under the right conditions and drip inside.
     
  11. Oct 19, 2019 #11

    ckev70

    ckev70

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    There's no solid structure under the current corrugated boards. tearing down the structure and rebuilding it to code would be very costly. This was enclosed patio was completed in the late 60s by a prior owner.

    I'll need to see if I can determine the dimension of the posts to determine what load it can handle.
     
  12. Oct 19, 2019 #12

    nealtw

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    It looks like you have venting so who ever did it was trying to do it right, I think I would just replace it with the metal with what ever underlayment that would be called for that roofing.
     
  13. Oct 20, 2019 #13

    oldognewtrick

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    Hard to install underlayments over open span rafters.

    If it were mine I'd add structure and put decking up. Now's the time to fix it the best you can...just my 2 cents.
     
  14. Oct 20, 2019 #14

    ckev70

    ckev70

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    The Ondura product seems to be what is installed.

    Oldognewtrick: when you mention adding structure, are you referring to adding additional 2x4 rafter support (most likely will need hanger joists) so it's only 24" oc or some else?
    I'm definitely considering a metal roof but would want to add some extra support as well.
     
  15. Oct 20, 2019 #15

    bud16415

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    The cheapest and lightest way to go IMO would be to cover the whole area with 6 mill plastic like they use on greenhouses. Stretch that across and then run purlins starting at the bottom and working up 24” OC. Then add the corrugated steel barn roofing. The purlins give you something to walk around on when laying the steel.


    The steel comes in a variety of colors and you can order it cut to length and they have matching screw colors. There is a starter piece with a drip edge for the lower edge and end pieces to close off the ends. They will also make you the flashing piece for the top to fit under the siding.


    The 6 mill should catch any dew that forms below the steel.


    In your warm area and with the material you had on before it didn’t seem to be a problem.
     
  16. Oct 20, 2019 #16

    ckev70

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    Thanks. Definitely there is no vapor barrier so great ideal. Would it still work with insulation? previously after I discovered leaks I had to remove some of the ceiling sheetrock and on cold mornings it would have condensation on the bottom side of the Ondura. It does have fiberglass at least in some areas, but there is no air space between the insulation and the roofing material and the finished ceiling.
     
  17. Oct 20, 2019 #17

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    No, you will create a second vapor barrier condusive to molding issues.
     
  18. Oct 21, 2019 #18

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Would something like Tyvek or Dupont Roof protector be a better product?


    Around here when they do the agricultural roofing on heated buildings or homes even they space it up with purlins away from the roof leaving an air space. I’m told the idea is to keep the steel the same temp on both sides to avoid the condensation plus a secondary air flow space to the ridge cap. The space between the ceiling and the roofing still gets ventilated as normal and most of the time they ether have sheathing and tar paper or if it is trusses in a garage or heated barn they unroll insulation sealed in plastic over the trusses and then pinch it down where the purlin hits the truss.


    The pictures show venting cut into the top of the wall but the room is a non-heated space. So I’m guessing the insulation is trying to keep heat out.
     

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