Sanding hardwood plywood

Discussion in 'Carpentry and Woodworking' started by jmc0319, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. Jan 23, 2014 #1

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    Just wondering if there is a trick to sanding birch plywood. That is should I go from coarse to fine like other wood? I just don't want to make it "fuzzy" if that makes sense.
     
  2. Jan 23, 2014 #2

    nealtw

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    There is very little birch on a plywood core, it'll take a gentle touch. If coarse is need, very little with 80 grit maybe and go to 120. Testing is great.
     
  3. Jan 23, 2014 #3

    jmc0319

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    Thanks Neal. So when you say gentle do you mean maybe 120 or 220 only? I agree with testing
     
  4. Jan 23, 2014 #4

    nealtw

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    I used to build boxes and things with this stuff we did a little sanding on a 6x48 table belt sander 80 grit and finished with a 100 grit random orbit. This was for artists to paint on, any finer sanding and the paint would run to easily. Everyone I put on that job sanded right thru the birch a few times before they got it down.
     
  5. Jan 29, 2014 #5

    jmc0319

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    Here are a couple of pictures of my completed bookcase before sanding and staining. It measures 80"x34". My next question is whether I should use a brush or a rag for stain. I would live opinions please. ImageUploadedByHome Repair1390965183.322272.jpg ImageUploadedByHome Repair1390965224.142320.jpg
     
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  6. Jan 29, 2014 #6

    nealtw

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    Well done, we always shipped raw wood but the customers always used minwax stains because it has less oil in it and you can finish with water based finishes like diamond coat. As far as brush or rag, back to testing for effect.
     
  7. Jan 29, 2014 #7

    bud16415

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    Very nice. I will 9 times out of 10 go with a rag or several rags. I tend to work the stain into the wood and wipe away as I go. Very seldom do I paint it on and wait some time and then take off the excess.

    Try out a few methods on some scrap wood, also good idea to make sure the stain will react with your wood like what the sample in the store looked like. I have many times taken a sample of the wood with me to the paint store to try it out before buying.

    Very nice design and workmanship. Did you follow a plan or is that your design? Taking orders?


    :clap:
     
  8. Jan 29, 2014 #8

    jmc0319

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    Thanks guys.

    Bud - it is a combination of a few things I've seen and my own modifications. I tend to go with what I'm feeling as I go. It is great fun and relaxing. More testing on samples. I bought three sample colors and two different finishes. I am creating samples of all colors and finishes and now I will also create samples with rag and brush. I don't want to mess this up now.
     
  9. Jan 30, 2014 #9

    jmc0319

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    One last question about sanding. Would you use a random orb sander or do it by hand with a sanding block?. Again this is birch ply and pine face frame.


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  10. Jan 31, 2014 #10

    nealtw

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    Pretty much what ever works for the area that needs sanding.
     
  11. Jan 31, 2014 #11

    bud16415

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    You might want to experiment just a little with a sanding sealer also. Some woods will absorb stain at a very uneven rate across the piece. Plywood’s will do this. The sealer fills the pours and will make the stain go on more even. Just something to think about.
     
  12. Feb 1, 2014 #12

    jmc0319

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    Is that the same as pre-stain conditioner? I test that on a piece and it seems to really help life the fibers for one lady sanding.


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  13. Feb 5, 2014 #13

    jmc0319

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    Ok so I am about to take my chainsaw to the bookcase I just built!!!
    All went well with the stain and most of the poly. However today the second coat of poly on the inside of a couple of shelves dried to a white tint. Does that mean I put too much on it? What are my options? Here are a couple of pictures of the rest of the bookcase. ImageUploadedByHome Repair1391644522.471335.jpg ImageUploadedByHome Repair1391644566.059328.jpg


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  14. Feb 6, 2014 #14

    oldognewtrick

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    Give it a couple days, it might just clear up as it cures out. No chain saw yet.
     
  15. Feb 6, 2014 #15

    jmc0319

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    I sure hope so. I will give it a couple of days. If it does not clear up is my only option to sand those places and reapply urethane?
     
  16. Feb 6, 2014 #16

    bud16415

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    I started a thread a couple months ago when I did my first floor floors. It was a nightmare and you might want to read thru that thread. After that I learned a trick that sometimes helps and if you do it within a day or two I’m told it works. That is to heat the area with something like a hair dryer I don’t know if a heat gun would be too hot or if you uses one to try it don’t get to close to the surface to burn the poly. In my case the first coat went on perfect as it had bare wood below and could outgas both ways. The more coats the bigger the problem and for me it was I applied it with a roller and the white was trapped air. You will be fine if the heat doesn’t work just sanding those areas and they will look white after sanding and then putting poly on will clear right up. I ended up spot sanding a huge amount of my floor.

    http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f107/i-should-have-asked-16565/
     
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  17. Feb 6, 2014 #17

    jmc0319

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    Excellent thanks Bud. If I have to sNd would you go with 150 then 220 pr direct to 220?


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  18. Feb 6, 2014 #18

    bud16415

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    I would always step up thru the papers. I think you can get there both ways but less elbow grease and less paper doing the steps. I have a little B&D mouse sander and I’m in love with that thing. Try the grit on some of your samples first if you want to get a feel for how they will cut.

    By the way it looks really nice.
     
  19. Feb 6, 2014 #19

    jmc0319

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    Thanks Bud. I too love my mouse. It's great for corners. Will let you know how I do.
     
  20. Feb 6, 2014 #20

    jmc0319

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    Ok well I did what I could do by sanding the hazy spots. It worked to a level of satisfaction not excitement. I am just going to leave it as it is now. It looks fine. In looking back I think I now know what I did. The hazy spots were all in or around the corners. That is where the shelves meet the walls of the bookcase. I used a brush for the entire outside and it worked perfectly. For some reason I decided that a foam brush might be easier for the inside. Well I think I loaded the foam brush up too much and out too much on. The corners are hard to get. I promise I will never use a foam brush again. I have much better luck with real brushes.

    Thanks for your help. Bookcase done on to next project.


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