Smell around old septic?

Discussion in 'Bricks, Masonry and Concrete' started by Jungle, Jul 1, 2014.

  1. Jul 1, 2014 #1

    Jungle

    Jungle

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    Is possible it is a bit of smell is normal? I guess not since it was coming into the house. There is a pipe coming out the side, so i put a stick down it i was hard could not get through. I guess i have to dig up the top and check....
     
  2. Jul 1, 2014 #2

    Jungle

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    Ok, i got to the hatch. I can't get it off. I guess wait till the skid steer should be easy to get off.

    Do you guys know if they leave the hatch on decommissioned septic or not? I would think not...
     
  3. Jul 1, 2014 #3

    Jungle

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    Okay prybar got it off.

    Seems to be 1" of water in there, sort of clear, It just rain 5-10mm in the last day.

    Surprisingly there is no smell.

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    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
  4. Jul 1, 2014 #4

    Jungle

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  5. Jul 1, 2014 #5

    Jungle

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    I talked to a pump out guy, he says the water should not be a problem and i should just fill it in and leave the hatch off. Since it's his business i guess we can rely on that answer since he could have made money off me.

    Ya'll agree?
     
  6. Jul 1, 2014 #6

    carnuck

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    Tough call. I would at least add tank enzymes while it's open. The smell could be from a weeping toilet ring in the house.
     
  7. Jul 1, 2014 #7

    Jungle

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    I'm think now the smell was coming from a leak from the sewer connection when they hooked it up. Probably in the soil that is in pile now.

    The Abs elbow 90 degrees then a female connector to the 4' sewer pipe with the rubber gasket. The female being smaller perhaps slipped off by the soil sinking, maybe a car or truck drove over the lawn.

    Haven't notice the smell for a while. I think it's gone.

    The open septic has no smell so i guess no problem. How could there be after 10 or 20 years?

    I suppose there will be lots of soil left over from this excavation so just as well to put in the old tank now.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
  8. Jul 2, 2014 #8

    nealtw

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    1st, don't leave it open for any time, friends of mine had one open waiting for a pump truck and lost a 2 year old baby in it.
    We always had to get them pumped break down the lid all of it and over fill it with sand wet it down so the sand would settle Compact before covering, the fear was a home for rats and things.
     
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  9. Jul 2, 2014 #9

    Jungle

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    A filled a bit of it, i'll wait till the skid steer to the rest. It holds a lot, probably why it wasn't filled.. I notice a lot of mice around maybe they like it there.
     
  10. Jul 3, 2014 #10

    Jungle

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    Anaerobic Conditions

    When a soil becomes water logged, it provides the perfect conditions for anaerobic bacteria, which are a type of microorganism that can only survive in the absence of oxygen. Soil with anaerobic bacteria will have a very bad smell. Soils in low, poorly-drained areas with lots of clay or organic matter are the most likely to provide the necessary conditions for this type of noxious bacterial. The same conditions can develop in houseplants if the pots are not well drained or if they are over-watered.

    from ehow.com
     
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  11. Jul 4, 2014 #11

    nealtw

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    That's why you pump the tank before filling it.
     
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  12. Jul 4, 2014 #12

    slownsteady

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    Why would a septic tank be so close to a wall? Is that next to the house? Maybe it's some kind of dry well......
     
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  13. Jul 4, 2014 #13

    Jungle

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    Ya i thought that too slowandsteady, it was hard digging around, the machine and it was going bang bang against the walls.

    Sounds like this bacteria condition is common with poor draining soil even without septic. Maybe it was pumped out and not filled in? Both neighbors had septic at one time too.. There are lots of grubs around. No gutters for years compound the problem pushes the bacteria into the foundations walls creating the sewage smell, mold... Probably could have been elevated by improving the soil aggregate. Maybe pour the enzymes down the foundation wall might have worked.

    Do you think these enzymes are worth $12 to pour around into the soil? Probably need a few bottles. Presumably the problem will go away once the drainage problem and aggregate problem is fixed. Another reason why i should put the gutter to drain pipe, we have a serious soil problem because of excess dampness in this area.

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    Last edited: Jul 4, 2014
  14. Jul 6, 2014 #14

    slownsteady

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    Once you turn that soil out and spread it around with the machine, the smell will go away as the bacteria dies (if anaerobic bacteria is exposed to an aerobic environment....). Should be nice & fertile.

    As for the old tank, yeah, you could break the cover and fill it. Did you check to see if the outlet is still there? Where does it run to? I'm still thinking how it could be used to route your drainage, but if it is so close to the house, maybe not a good idea.
     
  15. Jul 6, 2014 #15

    zannej

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    I definitely vote for having it completely drained and filled in with dirt. Otherwise it can collapse and be dangerous. I've found that pouring lime (white powder-- not the fruit) on raw sewer dirt can help mitigate the smell.
     
  16. Jul 6, 2014 #16

    Jungle

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    I've notice the smell is around the old septic and back wall. Same smell that was coming into the house.

    Do you think i should get fresh back fill delivered and move this old dirt to the end of the property? I have some other soil from the old area where the garage was.
    The enzymes might not work.
     
  17. Jul 6, 2014 #17

    zannej

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    You might need to get the smelly dirt hauled off. There are regulations about disposing of soil that has become saturated with sewage. Just how much dirt is it though? You might be able to try lime and if it doesn't work, then have it hauled off.
     
  18. Jul 6, 2014 #18

    slownsteady

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    I think trying to spread liquid enzymes on a large dirt pile would be a waste of money. The limestone might work. Just letting it die off naturally will work, but it may take some time and depending on kids / pets / traffic in the area may not be a great choice either. Leave the smelly soil in the bottom of the tank and cover it with clean soil??? (I'm not sure).

    Which brings up the question; do you have to plug up the inlet & outlet of the tank?
     
  19. Jul 6, 2014 #19

    Jungle

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    It is plugged already. I am going to get the sup pump and drain out the water. My guess it was broken for some time and they may have had it pumped before, there is nothing but sand and dirt in there.
    I just move the dirt from the back and use it. The other thing to do is add foam bits to the back fill will provide air.
    The smell is not that bad, you wouldn't notice it unless i really pointed it out to you. For me it is distinct. Isn't that much soil perhaps 25'x3' x6' should have plenty after the gravel goes in.
    I was going to pour the enzymes around the foundation because there is probably bad soil down there.
     
  20. Jul 7, 2014 #20

    zannej

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    So long as there is no sewage in the soil that is at the bottom it should be ok. The health inspector told me that the reason tanks have to be completely drained is because over time the crud works its way up to the surface and is a health hazard. So maybe lime AND dump it in the bottom? or dump it in the bottom, layer of lime, and then fill over it? Lime sucks out the moisture and the moisture is one of the things that helps the bacteria grow and stink. Just don't get it on your skin.
     

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