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Square Cut for repairing drywall

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tk3000

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Hello,
Previous to own a house, it was vacant and low life form criminals cause lots of destruction including pulling old wires from walls. So, I am in the process of doing lots of things including repairing the drywall. Most of the time I only want to replace the portion that is damaged between studs so there is a base of support. The following shows an example of a damaged drywall:




And then how I approached it to make a square cut between studs:

(this is not a final cut, there is need to some adjustments..)

Initially, I traced a line at the center of the studs with a chalk heel and then used a roto zip to cut, but the rotozip proved to be inefficient (hitting nails, messy, etc) and slow for this application I simply used a utility knife (besides using the util knife to cut through the caulking joints). Any insights on how to approach these cutouts
 

Snoonyb

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Hello,
Previous to own a house, it was vacant and low life form criminals cause lots of destruction including pulling old wires from walls. So, I am in the process of doing lots of things including repairing the drywall. Most of the time I only want to replace the portion that is damaged between studs so there is a base of support. The following shows an example of a damaged drywall:




And then how I approached it to make a square cut between studs:

(this is not a final cut, there is need to some adjustments..)

Initially, I traced a line at the center of the studs with a chalk heel and then used a roto zip to cut, but the rotozip proved to be inefficient (hitting nails, messy, etc) and slow for this application I simply used a utility knife (besides using the util knife to cut through the caulking joints). Any insights on how to approach these cutouts
For this particular repair, since you have a return on the right the easiest thing to provide backing is to nail a 1X2 too the stud, and while your at it, another on the left.

Generally, the prep is a matter of what you become accustomed to. Some are really fast with a utility knife and a whet stone, and other use a drywall hatchet and a utility knife.

You just need to find yourself.
 

nealtw

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On the right side you can just add 2x4 between the block and the top and bottom plates, a few inches away from the corner works good, if that make it easier.
 

tk3000

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Nealtw, Snoony: thanks for the input. I will add extra support in addition to screw the drywall to the bottom and top wall plate as well. It occurs to me that sometimes whilst cutting the drywall at the center of the stud and them ripping the bad part off, the remaining drywall on the edges of the stud tends to lose some of its gypsum powder at the edges as shown in the pic below:


Basically, at the very edge of the stud the drywall paper remains but behind it there is almost no filling powder. Could I simply fill it with drywall compound?
 

nealtw

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You don't want voids behind the paper, so you would remove paper so it can be filled or, what I would do is move over about six inches and cut a new nice straight line and remove that drywall. Then you can just slide a 2x4 behind it screw thru the old drywall to hold it there and make your joint there.
 

Snoonyb

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Nealtw, Snoony: thanks for the input. I will add extra support in addition to screw the drywall to the bottom and top wall plate as well. It occurs to me that sometimes whilst cutting the drywall at the center of the stud and them ripping the bad part off, the remaining drywall on the edges of the stud tends to lose some of its gypsum powder at the edges as shown in the pic below:


Basically, at the very edge of the stud the drywall paper remains but behind it there is almost no filling powder. Could I simply fill it with drywall compound?
It appears that this i where two sheets, natural ends, butted together and the residue that remains is broken off of the removed sheet, and the paper that appears to overhang, is joint tape, not drywall paper.

I'd just make sure all the nails are pulled, and cut the tape or lift it completely off, remove the residue and set the new sheet.
 

nealtw

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If you have more of those, just cut beside the stud and 3" away so you have a 3" slot, slide in a 2x6 on the flat screw to drywall on one side and to the stud on the other side. just poke some screws on the 2x6 for handles.
 

slownsteady

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Once you remove that paper and the remaining gypsum, you might have enough stud exposed to fasten the new sheet to. Then you probably won't need to add a nailer.
 

frodo

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buy a dremal with a sheet rock bit and a 4'' straight edge i like a 8'' straight edge

you can hold the staraight edge against the wall and make a quick neat cut.
 

bud16415

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buy a dremal with a sheet rock bit and a 4'' straight edge i like a 8'' straight edge

you can hold the staraight edge against the wall and make a quick neat cut.
4 inch straight edge is pretty short. :p
 

tk3000

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buy a dremal with a sheet rock bit and a 4'' straight edge i like a 8'' straight edge

you can hold the staraight edge against the wall and make a quick neat cut.
I believe that the cut does not have to perfect, after all it will be filled with mud and joint paper. I have 6ft straight edge, but for such large spans I prefer to use a chalk line (two nails to affix the cord and creates a line).

I live the util knife because there is not dust all over and I can better deal with the nails throughout the stud. I have dremel, I will the sheet rock bit a try.

thks!
 

tk3000

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You don't want voids behind the paper, so you would remove paper so it can be filled or, what I would do is move over about six inches and cut a new nice straight line and remove that drywall. Then you can just slide a 2x4 behind it screw thru the old drywall to hold it there and make your joint there.
But there seems to be a wood strip or furry strip behind the drywall as shown in the post #4. Maybe it was a repair done in the past, but it seems that often there is an additional wood strip at the studs where a joint is made.

Yeah, better to simply cut more drywall since drywall is fairly cheap instead of trying to fill large voids.
 

nealtw

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But there seems to be a wood strip or furry strip behind the drywall as shown in the post #4. Maybe it was a repair done in the past, but it seems that often there is an additional wood strip at the studs where a joint is made.

Yeah, better to simply cut more drywall since drywall is fairly cheap instead of trying to fill large voids.
Are sure that isn't just another stud??
 

jeffmattero76

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I uss a sawzall with a flexible metal cutting blade. Hammer a hole in the drywall you want to remove, insert the blade and approach the stud on an angle. Once your blade hits the stud, keep it tight to the stud and move it down the wall. Then add nailers on the left and right attached to the studs and install the new drywall.
 

tk3000

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Are sure that isn't just another stud??
I am pretty it is not since I removed drywall from other studs on the same wall and same side and it does not have this extra wood strip on the stud.
 

tk3000

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I uss a sawzall with a flexible metal cutting blade. Hammer a hole in the drywall you want to remove, insert the blade and approach the stud on an angle. Once your blade hits the stud, keep it tight to the stud and move it down the wall. Then add nailers on the left and right attached to the studs and install the new drywall.
Wow, by sawzall you a "reciprocating saw". A reciprocating saw with a reciprocating action is great to cut drywall (without any precision) in voided spaces. But, yeah, it could be used if I add nailers and do not use the stud as base for the new drywall at all. It is a different approach

thks!
 

nealtw

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I am pretty it is not since I removed drywall from other studs on the same wall and same side and it does not have this extra wood strip on the stud.
They may have been dealing with warped studs and just space it out.

In new houses I to would use a sawsall but some older drywall had asbestos in it so a knife is a better bet.
 

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