Steel studs and attaching drywall

Help Support House Repair Talk:

vinny186

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
196
Reaction score
31
I bought self-tapping screws specifically for connecting steel studs to each other but the head of the screw sticks out too far, so where the studs attach to the top and bottom plate the screw head sticks out too much and it seems like it will affect how the drywall sits on the framing, meaning it won't sit flat.
 

bud16415

Fixer Upper
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
5,424
Reaction score
1,931
Location
Erie, PA
They should dent into the back of the drywall.
 

Mastercarpenty

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2016
Messages
226
Reaction score
106
It usually half-dents and half-floats over the panhead screws. It's not a problem. Be sure you're using fine-thread screws for the drywall attachment as they hold better in metal.

Phil
 

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
3,769
Reaction score
719
There are basically 2 types of screws used fir the assembly of steel stud walls, pan head black phosphate and truss head.

Both are available in "A" point and tech.

The pan head black phosphate are often referred to as "framers" and are the prevalent screw used and the "tech" version, are the self drilling.

The truss head are plated and have a flatter head profile.
 

bud16415

Fixer Upper
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
5,424
Reaction score
1,931
Location
Erie, PA
They also make a crimping tool if you want to spend a few bucks.

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMMJCkvOEXY[/ame]
 

Sparky617

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2014
Messages
1,129
Reaction score
401
Location
Cary NC
If you're going to be doing a lot of drywall work in steel studs you're going to want a drywall screw gun. Cordless drills don't spin fast enough to get the self-tapping screws started. They'll eventually cut in and drive but it takes forever. I was doing a lot of steel stud work at my kids' private elementary school. When I first started I was using a cordless drill, after awhile I broke down and bought a corded driver. Once you get the hang of it and get it dialed in right it makes the process much faster.
 

nealtw

Contractor retired
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
24,742
Reaction score
3,389
Location
Chiliwack BC Canada
If you're going to be doing a lot of drywall work in steel studs you're going to want a drywall screw gun. Cordless drills don't spin fast enough to get the self-tapping screws started. They'll eventually cut in and drive but it takes forever. I was doing a lot of steel stud work at my kids' private elementary school. When I first started I was using a cordless drill, after awhile I broke down and bought a corded driver. Once you get the hang of it and get it dialed in right it makes the process much faster.
You use fine thread drywall screws for steel studs.
 

Sparky617

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2014
Messages
1,129
Reaction score
401
Location
Cary NC
You use fine thread drywall screws for steel studs.
I've used screws specifically for steel studs, I've used coarse and I've used fine. Doesn't matter which one I use the drywall screw gun is much faster than a cordless drill. I made do for a long time, but the drywall gun is a much better tool for the job if you're going to do a lot of drywall on steel studs. It still gets a good work out when I do volunteer work hanging sheetrock. Once I'm dialed in I can drive 3 screws in the time it takes someone using a cordless drill to drive one. If I had one of those fancy ones that used drywall screws that are collated and fed automatically I could really fly. Can't justify that expense as a DIYer though.
 
Last edited:

Snoonyb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
3,769
Reaction score
719
The distinction between coarse and fine thread comes from the gauge of the steel being worked with, where tin can or 25ga studs you experience less "spinout" with "A" point coarse thread, 20ga and lower are most often assembled with fine thread, tech screws.
 

Mastercarpenty

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2016
Messages
226
Reaction score
106
Most of the residential and DIY metal studding is the light-gauge stuff. Pointed screws hold better here because they expand the metal around them tightly as they go in instead of having metal removed by drilling. The fine-thread ones are recommended for metal because they have much more surface of the thread engaging the metal than coarse-threaded ones do. Coarse works better for wood because there's less tendency to tear out the wood fibers and strip or pull out. Drill points are needed for heavy-gauge studs because the pointed screws can't penetrate that much steel and they often break just as they go in from binding since the heavier steel doesn't expand around them.

I've got a stud crimper and indeed it's faster, but in more and more areas it's use is being prohibited. The problem isn't the crimped connection but over-zealous drywall installers who push so hard on the screw-gun that the connection comes apart. Since this is usually seen only inside the wall (invisible) it requires skill and care to avoid the issue and codes try to be idiot-proof in their required methods. Look for them to become universally outlawed soon.

Phil
 

vinny186

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
196
Reaction score
31
Thanks for all the suggestions.

The screws I used to assemble the studs did not hinder the hanging of the drywall - like someone said, the screws get indented into the drywall. I also used coarse fine screws to attach the drywall and I had to put my cordless on it's "2" setting, it definitely took longer than wood and a drywall bit was necessary because you're pushing so hard while drilling that the screw will often go thru the paper but I only had one wall so wasn't too much of a hassle.
 
Group Builder
Top