Termites coming from dirt between floor and wall

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nealtw

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So heat rays from the sun go thru brick and warm stuff on the other side. O K :confused:
I don't know what I don't know but let's look at what we do know. Termites were tracking water and came up the crack. So we know water was coming thru the brick and running down behind your wall.
What is going to happens to water after you have installed foam.
I am not sure I have enough info to make good suggestion.

BTW foam board joints just need red TUCK tape at the joints and a caulk that is made for it around the edges.

Perhaps you could look at breathable sealer for the outside of the brick.
 

Snoonyb

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Spotting the adhesive will leave a slight gap needed for moisture wicking through the brick, and instead of 2X4's, I would use 2X3 steel studs and eliminates the termite food source.

Yes it's a little more expensive in material, which is more than offset in the labor savings.

Remember, termites need to return to earth's moisture ever 24hrs, so whether or not there may be moisture wicking through the brick, it does not happen consistently enough to preclude that fact of nature.

And you do have subterranean termites.
 

Shakeyray

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Sorry snoonyb, I want to make sure I'm understanding your first paragraph. The adhesive will already leave a small gap and work good with the foam?

I completelt agree with the metal. I'm definitely considering metal studs as I go through the rest of the exterior walls.

I stopped the moisture from the crack, got the boards off the wall, and am hauling dirt around the perimeter with drainage pipe.....the house has a good slope but never had gutters so it's developed a pocket all the way around.....I'm very confident this will fix it.
 

Snoonyb

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If you dollop the adhesive as opposed to troweling or crosshatching with a caulking gun, you'll be more inclined to provide an ability for excessive moisture to find it's way down the wall.

There are specific metal boxes designed for steel stud construction, that easily clamp on and are held in place with a tech screw.
 

nealtw

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If you dollop the adhesive as opposed to troweling or crosshatching with a caulking gun, you'll be more inclined to provide an ability for excessive moisture to find it's way down the wall.

There are specific metal boxes designed for steel stud construction, that easily clamp on and are held in place with a tech screw.
Where do expect water to go when it gets t the bottom?

Metal studs are a pain in the *** when it comes to wiring.
 
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Snoonyb

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Where do expect water to go when it gets t the bottom?

Metal studs are a pain in the *** when it comes to wiring.
In the OP's climate zone the odds are that there will, seldom if ever, be sufficient moisture migration through the brick for that phenomenon to occur.

I always found wiring in steel stud framing to be a relief from romex.
 

nealtw

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In the OP's climate zone the odds are that there will, seldom if ever, be sufficient moisture migration through the brick for that phenomenon to occur.

I always found wiring in steel stud framing to be a relief from romex.
You might be right about the water, I would like to here from someone in the area that actually knows.

As long as the OP knows the difference in the wiring for metal studs,
 

nealtw

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How about for the floor? It's solid masonry walls....should I replace just the bottom piece or all the wall strips as well with pressure treated? And the floor is concrete...no crawlspace.
Can you figure out how your walls are built. How many layers thick and if two is there a space between them?

Solid-Masonry-Walls.jpg
 

Snoonyb

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In post #14 do you see any evidence of the migration you are concerned with?

Certainly, the OP should be able to avail himself of all the necessary advice needed to accomplish metal stud wiring, here-in, shouldn't he?

Here you can see the difference in the latitude of the UK, yours an the OP's;http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/imageg.htm
 
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Shakeyray

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have solid Norwegian brick. They are all facing one way similar to the first pic. They have tiny little holes but ate mostly solid and one course...no double....almost 12 inches long and about 5 or 6 inches wide. I have been told that there is very little problem with these drawing moisure.....I think it was from that crack (50 years of settling) and the perimeter sitting in water. Regardless, I made sure I got all the wood out between the foam and brick just in case.

Nonetheless, I have caulked the boards with PL foam board adhesive and taped them. I have about a 1/4 to 1/2 gap by default.....I wasn't going to take a concrete sander to the walls. I'm putting up the 2x4 wall now.

I'm going to look into that compound....I would feel better knowing the walls were completely fireproof. I guess UK would be quite a bit north from here latitudinally.I suppose Florida would be closer to north africa.....still, I think something like that is better than these sheets. Probably need a PE stamp in this area.

14834916757032001967930.jpg
 
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pbesong

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If you have subterrainian termites, you will need an exterminator. If you treat the area where they're coming in, they'll just find a new route. They can be VERY destructive. I had them in my house in PA and they did a lot of damage to the sill plates and floor joists especially. An exterminator will shoot a pesticide into your soil about ever foot around your house and will go to your basement and drill holes in the floor and walls to shoot the pesticide into the soil from there as well. This creates a barrier to prevent them from entering your house from anywhere. The colony will eventually die off from lack of wood to feed on. It cost us about $1200 to have the house treated back in 1994. Don't know what they charge these days. I think you can buy those bait traps, but I'm not sure how effective they are. Supposed to kill the colony due to the termites bringing poison back to the rest of them.
 
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