Tinting a Base 2 a Deeper Color

Discussion in 'Painting Forum' started by aNYCdb, Aug 14, 2018.

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  1. Aug 14, 2018 #1

    aNYCdb

    aNYCdb

    aNYCdb

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    So I wound up coming into possession of a 10 5Gal buckets of Glidden Exterior Semi-gloss in a base 2 and I was wondering if I could tint one of them to a deeper color (Kelly Green). The Local HD is more than happy to do whatever I ask (paint was originally sold there but no longer). Other than making sure there is room in the can for the tint I'm not sure if there is some trick to what I should ask them to do (they really had no suggestions). I am not concerned with it being a 100% correct color match.

    My understanding from the way the system works is that I would have to select the color and provide a paint barcode (from a different paint product) to kick things off.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Aug 14, 2018 #2

    kok328

    kok328

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    You should be able to give them a color swatch sample and they will determine the formula to achieve that color.
    It doesn't take much pigment to change color so I wouldn't really worry about room in the bucket for paint dye.
     
  3. Aug 14, 2018 #3

    aNYCdb

    aNYCdb

    aNYCdb

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    The problem is that everything is computer controlled there, so the issue is that if they put in a base 2 the computer is going to tell them to get a base 4 and if they put in a base 4 (or Deep Base) its going to come out way too light (because of the level of white (TiO2) which is probably 10-15% vs 0% in a deep base). I was hoping someone would have a suggestion of some way to "trick" the system (for example inputting it like we were tinting primer or porch paint). The tinting formula used is based on the assumption of the underlying base.
     
  4. Aug 14, 2018 #4

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    You are correct paint is always additive. If you start with a high white content base and want to make black the white will always be in there and you will always get gray.


    Modern paint scanners and computers systems I think will allow you to input a color and base and then add a correction factor to it to get another color within reason.


    There is no taking the white out.


    If you want to experiment take a small amount of what you have like an ounce. Then measure pigment added and if you can get something you like then scale it up.
     
  5. Aug 14, 2018 #5

    aNYCdb

    aNYCdb

    aNYCdb

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    I wound up taking a shot with a dark Kelly Green having them input it as if it was a primer and it came out a little bit lighter than the swatch, but otherwise close enough to what I was looking for.
     

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