Washing machine outlet box install

House Repair Talk

Help Support House Repair Talk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

shan2themax

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
1,113
Reaction score
1,333
Location
Proctorville, Ohio
So I bought this outlet box. It's push to connect. I have copper pipes.
There are no instructions in it. I mean I get its push to connect, but I am a process/theory person. I like to see the why's and hows... lol20240317_154750.jpg
20240317_163724.jpg

This is what I am replacing.... you will be able to tell instantly, why I am replacing it lol

20240317_152451.jpg

This is a wider shot of the area. So I am thinking of cutting a large area of drywall out so that it can all be repaired with one sheet
20240317_152451.jpg
That is actually NOT where I wanted that new outlet for the washer. I wanted it on the other side where the old one is (remember in the "what did you do today" forum, I want to turn the w/d around on the other wall).

Any tips for install?

I just realized you can get one of these boxes with the water hammer arrestor included. Would that be better to use? Or to just buy them separately to attatch to the back of the dryer? I feel like separately is a better idea, in the event it would fail.

Also, I am considering cutting the copper off closer to the floor and replacing with pex. I would just need the 1/2 x 1/2 push fittings correct?

For both applications, is there a certain amount of pipe or pex that should go inside the fitting? Like me mark at a certain point to make sure that it is seated properly? (I don't have great hand strength sometimes)

I am hoping to try to get this done on my up coming days off, so I want a list of everything I need to pick up on Thursday before/after my appt.
 
Why would you install a water hammer devise on an appliance, that isn't supplied with water?
"I just realized you can get one of these boxes with the water hammer arrestor included. Would that be better to use? Or to just buy them separately to attatch to the back of the dryer? I feel like separately is a better idea, in the event it would fail."

Are the 120V & the 240V receptacles adjacent to the existing washer connections both live or abandoned?
 
Here's some info about your box;
【PIPE COMPATIBILITY】: This washing machine outlet box is compatible with versatile pipe systems. The inlets work well with 1/2 inch PEX, copper, CPVC, or PE-RT pipes; the outlets fit well with with 3/4 inch MHT washing machine hoses. The box is equiped with 1/4-turn hot and cold shut off valves and features both central and side drains, which is good for washing machine to drain off water.


You need to measure the fitting to measure the depth to the stop point in the fitting to determine the proper depth, because different fittings different depths.
 
Unless she edited it, I didn't see her say dryer, but I knew it was for those water supply things. I found a guide. https://www.pexuniverse.com/how-to-make-a-push-connection
See the bottom of the page.

If it's 3/4" it needs to be 1-1/8" deep into the fitting. I'd personally probably switch to PEX for more flexibility. I've never used a water hammer on any of my stuff and it doesn't seem to be an issue for me.

The new box looks good. I got something similar that I'm going to install but it is pex barb.

I like that you have a GFCI outlet for the washing machine. Is the dryer 3-prong or 4-prong? I can't remember if you ever said.

Hopefully once you get some good rest you can fix up the drywall, but it looks better than my laundry room right now.
 
You said water hammer device, attached to the dryer.
I sure did say dryer..... didn't mean dryer, corrected it in the reply....
It's interesting that you thought I "actually" meant dryer.... apparently you never make typos.....
I mean...... I'm not even sure why I am responding to this to begin with..... I must REALLY be an idiot.
🙄😒
 
I sure did say dryer..... didn't mean dryer, corrected it in the reply....
It's interesting that you thought I "actually" meant dryer.... apparently you never make typos.....
I mean...... I'm not even sure why I am responding to this to begin with..... I must REALLY be an idiot.
🙄😒
OH, don't worry, I knew it was a typo, which I courteously, in jest, pointed out.

Here is a link to your product; https://www.tiendamia.cr/p/amz/b0bx...slN1tjHI_7U7Lz35RPkWs-1710710963-0.0.1.1-1493


And, since we're on the subject, I'd move all the services behind the relocated appliances, as opposed to all the long cords and supply lines draped around the walls.
 
Last edited:
I'm sure that you have checked the general instructions on how to install push-to-connect fittings (e.g., ).
There are two things about the part that you showed that I would watch out for: (1) making sure that the copper pipes are cut exactly level or, if you are unable to adjust each faucet height up or down, you might end up uneven connections and the corresponding higher risk of leaks, and (2) you might need to recess the piece that goes across where it screws to the 2x4s (just like recessing door hinges). I'm guessing from the photo but I'd imagine that if you don't, you'll end up a 1/8-in bulge in the drywall which you then have to compensate. If you are doing a full 4x8' sheet of drywall it is easier to disguise but, with smaller repairs, in my experience not handling that beforehand a much bigger headache (drywall cracking, seams not level, etc.).
 
Shan, use this chart to determine the insertion depth for your push to connect.


image.jpg

1/2” calls for 15/16” insertion depth. Just mark your Pex or copper at 15/16” with a sharpie and push your connector until it gets to that point (or close).

Here’s a diagram I made when I cleaned up my plumbing a little. I hope it helps. Haha!

IMG_7250.jpeg
 
Back
Top