adding outdoor washer and dryer

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paulmars

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I've read over the codes https://www.nfpa.org/NEC/About-the-NEC/Explore-the-2017-NEC?openpage=58&access=open

But still have some questions.

I plan on adding one 20A 115vac breaker and one 30A 230vac breaker. Then running the wires in two conduits thru the block wall from inside garage to the outside. then securing to wet rated surface mount boxes, one each for the 115vac and the 230vac electrical socket receptacles.

The boxes and enclosed covers will be wet outdoor rated.

The receptacles will be GFCI.

I believe the codes said I needed a cutoff outside the house. Why?

When I read the codes a few years ago, I though I read mention of 4 prong required for the 230vac and I think there was also instructions on how to hook up a 4 conductor cord to the older 3 terminal dryers, but i cant find that now.

Any advice will be appreciated.

paul
 

paulmars

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can I use one conduit for both?
or

Can I tap the 115 off of one side of the 230, like my stove does?
 

kok328

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I believe local code supersedes NEC. What's your locality?
How long is the run?
 

hornetd

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Here is the basic problem. Neither the washer or dryer will be listed for wet locations. If there is no roof over the outside installation then it is a code violation no matter how you wire it. If it is a covered area then the easiest way to install the needed outlets may by to use a recreational vehicle outlet box for thirty amp cords which also contains a NEMA 5-20R receptacle or a duplex 5-15R receptacle. It will look somewhat like this.


You will have to change the 240/120 volt NEMA 14-50R to a NEMA 14-30R receptacle that will except your dryer cord. These boxes are designed for Recreational vehicle hookups so they completely cover the receptacles and the plugged in cords.

Laundry circuits are required to be 20 ampere and a twenty ampere circuit may only supply 20 ampere receptacles or 2 or more 15 ampere receptacles.

It is absolutely vital that you wire the dryer to a 4 wire circuit with a separate Equipment Grounding (Bonding) Conductor (EGC) because that will definately be a damp location and the user will be standing on the ground or on concrete both of which are conductive surfaces that would provide the rest of the pathway back to the transformer from whence it came for the 30 milliamperes needed to kill them. When a three wire dryer is operating there is enough current available from some of the metallic parts to harm you. If the neutral of a three wire dryer goes open the entire chassis of the dryer will go high at 120 volts to ground as soon as someone standing on that conductive surface tries to turn it on. That will equal a family tragedy.

--
Tom Horne
 
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