Applying polycrylic over latex paint on wall?

Discussion in 'Painting Forum' started by amberteurism, Jan 7, 2015.

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  1. Jan 7, 2015 #1

    amberteurism

    amberteurism

    amberteurism

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    Hello!
    So, I am repainting our kitchen walls and trim. I am almost done with painting and was thinking of applying a polycrylic to the baseboards so they don't get beat up as easily. I was also considering applying polycrylic to the wall above the sink (we have Minwax under the sink so will use that brand). Splashing water and whatever really did a number on the wall before there and we do not have time or money to put up a back splash. I put spray-on shellac on it (see uneven sheen picture below) but only one coat at this point so it looks awful. I am wondering if I can apply a poly to that area and if so should I do it to the entire wall above the counter top around the kitchen to keep the sheen the same? The latex I used is eggshell and just want to make sure the polycrylic isn't going to rub it off!

    The attached photos are our kitchen before and now with the new cupboards and paint job (teal color) to show you what I am working with. I am going to have to figure out how to put photos in the post without a url - very strange...

    old kitchen.jpg

    photo 2 (8).jpg

    photo 3 (7).jpg

    photo 1 (7).jpg
     
  2. Jan 7, 2015 #2

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    I wouldn’t do poly over paint myself and I have used a lot of poly and paint together in making home theater projection screens. Both water based products will mix together and adding poly to paint changes the sheen and toughens the paint.

    Behind the sink area I would use the same brand and color paint as the room except in a gloss sheen. It will look different so finding a starting and stopping point will be important. I would go from behind the fridge to the corner I think.
     
  3. Jan 7, 2015 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Woodgrain wrap vinyl is the stuff you see on really cheap furnature made out of partical board. They also make a mat finish clear that I have used to cover paint or wallpaper to protect it in wet areas. There were many brands years ago and a little hard to find today.
    http://www.topvinylfilms.com/wood-grain-wrap-vinyl/
     
  4. Jan 7, 2015 #4

    amberteurism

    amberteurism

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    Cool, thank you. I was thinking the same area so maybe I will do that. Going to check out those vinyl things below too.

    Can I just paint another coat over that shellac area to get rid of that sheen? I still have to do another coat behind the fridge and the rest of that wall so I am going to do it anyway I guess. Darnit. Sometimes I do things without thinking them through, which creates a lot more work for me. Ugh.
     
  5. Jan 7, 2015 #5

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    shellac is a primer and should take paint no problem.
    That vinyl can be a bear to put up and there are tricks.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2015 #6

    amberteurism

    amberteurism

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    Great. Glad I didn't mess up the entire kitchen with this shellac mishap. I searched the site and didn't find any clear stuff anyway. I am thinking of making a larger less protruding version of the thing below to put above the sink.
    I am going to stain it dark walnut like the cabinets and leave other pieces natural, then throw some polyurethane over it. It can act sort of as a back splash, but provide something to look at as well. I have the scraps for it and my neighbor has some cedar just rotting away over there, so I may just do that and be done!!

    Thanks for the help you guys!

    wood art.jpg
     
  7. Jan 7, 2015 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Good luck with that one. Notice how nice all those pieces fit together like a jigsaw puzzle, that dosn't just happen when you put wood together. You would have to start with very dry wood and then seal it so it can't take on moisture. And then keep the dust off it.;)
     
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  8. Jan 7, 2015 #8

    amberteurism

    amberteurism

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    Haha. Thanks for the vote of confidence! My husband is pretty good working with wood, so maybe I'll just have him do it for me! :D
    I figured it would involve a lot of cutting and sanding (we don't have a planer). Any suggestions on sealing it? I could dry it out pretty quickly on our wood stove.
     
  9. Jan 7, 2015 #9

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

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    As cool as that panel looks, I think you will find it attracts dirt and grease and maybe even some splash from food prep. Many surfaces to clean.......
     

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