Broken Bulb

Discussion in 'General Appliance Discussion' started by ironhat, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. Jan 17, 2015 #1

    ironhat

    ironhat

    ironhat

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    I've never seen a good way to remove a broken bulb from its socket. I have such a situation in our fridg and with a disabled back I can't spend a lot of time messing with the socket which is in the front of the box and faces the rear. I've never found the potato trick to work so that leaves me with getting a grip on the socket with needle nose pliers and try to make the threads work.

    Do any of you folks use dielectric grease on their bulbs to avoid the fitting becoming galled together?

    OK, that's it and thanks in advance!
     
  2. Jan 17, 2015 #2

    slownsteady

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    I usually do the needle-nose thing. Sometimes, with a twisting motion on the pliers, you can reduce the diameter of the base enough to pull it out without wrestling against the thread.
     
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  3. Jan 17, 2015 #3

    ironhat

    ironhat

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    That's what I'm hoping for. Go in aggressively and collapse the sides. Thanks, I'll be on it first thing in the AM and after that my back should be wasted.

    Later,
    Chiz
     
  4. Jan 17, 2015 #4

    slownsteady

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    watch out for tiny pieces of glass that may still be in the base...especially in a fridge.
     
  5. Jan 17, 2015 #5

    jeff1

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  6. Jan 17, 2015 #6

    bud16415

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    It needs to be said.

    Pull the plug before trying any of the above.
    :)
     
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  7. Jan 17, 2015 #7

    DFBonnett

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    I use a thin film of petroleum jelly on the base of bulbs in damp or potentially damp environments such refrigerators, baths, kitchens, and exterior locations. So far so good.
     
  8. Jan 17, 2015 #8

    ironhat

    ironhat

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    :Success!!!
    And, I remembered to unplug the fridge before starting.:) I guess you don't get to become old without learning a few things. A little OT here but, when the wife is helping me these days (since my disability) she observes the set up, the precautions that I'm taking in process and then the cleanup. Early on she said, "You've done this before, haven't ya?!" Yea, I got her phone number and thinking about asking her in on a date (I can't get out much).

    Thanks again,
    Chiz
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2015
  9. Jan 17, 2015 #9

    havasu

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    Many DIY sites recommend using either a carrot or a potato to help remove broken bulbs, and is suppose to work great. I myself am too cheap to throw away a good vegetable, so I also use needle nose pliers.
     
  10. Apr 30, 2015 #10

    MaryAguila

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    Had the same problem this morning! Thanks for the tips. I used needle nose pliers and it came right out. Thanks for the reminder to unplug it first!
     
  11. May 1, 2015 #11

    nealtw

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    Pay attention to the colour of the base of the bulb and the socket, don't mix the different metals.
     
  12. May 1, 2015 #12

    elbo

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    there is anti corrosion compound (lubricant ) that is available from any electrical supply , including big box, stores. I use it on any place two electrical connections are made before screwing them together or splicing them. It works great on dissimilar metals such as a aluminum socket and copper bulb base (or visa-versa ). it5 is also a good precaution on similar metal connections
     
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