building a shed

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by paintinglady, Sep 23, 2005.

  1. Sep 23, 2005 #1

    paintinglady

    paintinglady

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    For those of you that are hand with hammers, saws and nails, how difficult is it to build a shed. I'm looking for something about 12 x 15, attractive but not overdone, at least 2 windows and the double door opening for lawn equipment along with a standard-sized entry door. Can you give me an idea as to how long this should take to complete and a difficulty level, so I'll know where to go with this?
     
  2. Sep 24, 2005 #2

    Chase

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    I bulit mine and it took a day my brother helped me it is a good size bulding but we did not put in windows though
    It was really cheaper for us to buy the materials and bulid it ourselves then to go buy one! At least I got the size I wanted instead of of those tiny buldings that really will not hold anything.
     
  3. Sep 24, 2005 #3

    fixitright

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    I agree with the other post here. You'll definitely save money building your own. Also, you won't be so limited on sizes, etc. Now, the only difficult part would be putting it together if you're not experienced with that. Not because you're a woman, either. I've seen many a man who can't do that type of work. You can buy blueprints for what you want, or you can use one of those computer programs to design it yourself (they're easier than you think), or you could pay someone to draw it up for you. Then you'll just need a list of supplies, which come with some blueprints and some of the computer programs give you a list according to your plans. You can also take your plans to Lowes or HomeDepot and they'll help you out. From there it's a matter of following directions.

    Good luck to you!
     
  4. Oct 2, 2005 #4

    sonofthesoil

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    make sure to buy a planer for your lumber - all 2x4s are NOT created equal - and you don't seem to address the issue of flooring - are you going to lay down a slab or cross-cut some beams and lay down a flooring over that?
     
  5. Oct 15, 2005 #5

    FirTrader

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    No offense sonof, but why on earth would you plane a 2x4 even if they are marginally different from one another? We're talking about a shed here, not a piano.

    I build big sheds like tiny houses - build a floor out of 2x6 or 2x8, and sheet it with 3/4 " treated ply, and then build walls and stand them, with the sheeting hanging below the wall (to cover the floor seem) and then some rafters and presto. Takes about 2 days if you've got everything you need on site. Sheds btw don't qualify for any kind of code, so far as I know, being "buildings of low human occupancy".
     
  6. Nov 14, 2005 #6

    2pyrs

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    I personally like the pre-cut units that can be put up in one weekend. My barn (12’x16’) is off the ground and sits on 4x4 posts. A good kit comes with a tape showing you how to assemble it. We have to have permit here to build any out buildings. The only time a permit is not needed is for a hoop house. By the way a hoop house cost about $75.00 for a 12'x12'

    2pyrs
     
  7. Nov 27, 2005 #7

    Gary

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    I would check with your local ordinances before building just to be sure about codes. Years ago I built a 12'x12' shed. I didn't need a permit or anything.
    Few years later I added on to the shed. I then needed a $10.00 permit. A couple years ago I built a second shed. I needed to submit plans, get a permit, go through the same inspections as a house, and then a final inspection to get occupancy, just like a house. So, make sure you know the local ordinaces before you start.

    I belong to the local Habitat for Humanity. Last summer we bought a pre-built shed from the local High School shop class. We were required to get a permit to put it on site. No big deal but it is a good idea to check before you proceed.
     
  8. Nov 29, 2005 #8

    shadebuilder

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    I would agree with furtrader 100%. Get some plans, a little help and a free weekend. best of luck.
     
  9. Jan 17, 2011 #9

    araujo

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    With a good plan a few friends, some BBQ ribs, you should be able to build you shed in a weekend. take care.
     
  10. Jan 17, 2011 #10

    daklaw

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    I recently did a small shed in a couple of days. I had no plans other than an idea in my mind what I wanted. I did a blog article with pictures on my experience. DIY Home Renovations » Construction and DIY I believe it is a DIY project most handy people can accomplish. It's just a shed.
     
  11. Jan 18, 2011 #11

    joecaption

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    A few rules of thumb.
    Never have a shed sitting to close to the ground. If it's to close you get whats called splash back when it rains and the sides will rot out.
    Windows add to the cost, slow down building it, allow someone to look inside that may be thinking about breaking in, makes an easy way to break in, takes up valubale wall space for hanging things.
    Never build it to small. By the time you add a work bench and some shelves there will little room for anything else.
    Use Advantec T&G sub flooring not pressure treated. Advantec has a 50 year warrenty, does not need ACQ approved fastners, and will not delaminate.
    Make sure the roof has an over hang. If not the waters going to be running down the sides and rot it out.
    I just hate T-11 plywood but that seems to be what a lot of people build them with. I seal the bottom of the T-111 with two coats or West System, shellic, or oil based primer. (what ever I seem to have left over from a job)
    I only use soild colored stain not paint on the face of it. Stain faids, it does not peel like paint will. And coat it with two coats on the outside and at least one coat before installing the panels on the back side at least 12" up from the bottom. That seals it so the panels do not rot out in a few years.
    Make sure to use drip cap on the outside edges of the roof sheathing so the water can not get to the end grains.
    Always use three hindges and use 3" screws on the doors, there heavy and will sag with just two.
    I've never seen a store bought shed door that has not rotted out where the cross bucks are on the door. Far better to use 2 X 4 bracing and cross buck on the inside of the door not the outside. If you still want that cross buck look on the outside use vinyl lumber with a piece of vinyl cap molding with silicone caulking behind them on any pieces that sit horizontal so the water runs off of the cross pieces, not 1 X 4 pine.
    Not sure where that other poster came up with the idea of needing planner. I've built 100's of buildings and never used one yet for 2 X 4's. It's not a Swiss watch your building.
     
  12. Jan 18, 2011 #12

    mudmixer

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    Much depends on the budget, where it will be located and what you want it to look like.

    My son built a 10x12 shed to not go over the local code limits and do things right at his pace and not have to bother with inspections. The great thing he did is to make it 10' high instead of the usual 8'. That dramatically increased the usable storage and use, because things could be stored on the wall and not interfere with the mobile "toys".

    He tucked it in a corner behind the attached garage and far enough from the house, so it was not the type that is out in the "back forty" since he wanted to keep it close and not ruin the usable space for the kids.

    He matched the roof pitch (standard shed trusses from a big box) to the house and got the same cheap vinyl siding, but it looks like it was intended to be there and built with the house, but it was a long term DIY job. The biggest challenge was to build a concrete ramp to the wide door without screwing things up (drainage, etc.).

    As long as you take your time and know what you want to do at your own speed.

    Dick
     
  13. Jan 20, 2011 #13

    frozenstar

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    Agree with you on this one. :) I think it is a very good advise. ;)
     

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