Ceramic Glass Cooktop

Discussion in 'General Appliance Discussion' started by ccc, Sep 29, 2006.

  1. Sep 29, 2006 #1

    ccc

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    Recently I purchased a Maytag ceramic glass cooktop. It is so much work to keep clean. I heard it was easier to keep clean. I would take my electric coil one any day after having this one. People who love them must not cook much. They are the awful to fry things. It is pretty to look at though. Any suggestions on keeping it clean? What kind of pots and pans are best to use?
     
  2. Sep 29, 2006 #2
    I use soap/water and Lysol to clean mine.

    Just a friendly warning to be careful. They scratch quite easy and once they do it's for good. So far I have yet to find a way to cover the scratches.
     
  3. Sep 29, 2006 #3

    jeff1

    jeff1

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    G'day,

    Some cleaning tips...

    http://www.applianceaid.com/cerantop.html

    A copy from Amana:

    What kind of cookware can I use on a glass smoothtop?

    Amana does not endorse any particular cookware brand for use on a smoothtop. We do not recommend using any glass, glass-ceramic, enamel-porcelain coated, or cast iron cookware. Small imperfections on the bottom of such cookware can scratch the smoothtop surface. While the surface is not “scratch-proof”, it is highly scratch and impact resistant. With proper cooking utensils and care, it will continue looking good through years of use.

    The cookware’s bottom diameter should closely match the size of the heating element or burner area for the best cooking efficiency. Pots and pans that are too large (extending more than one inch over the sides) may cause cooking times to increase. Pots and pans that are much smaller will result in energy loss and could increase the potential for accidents.

    We recommend using heavy-gauge metal cookware that has a smooth, flat bottom. The flatter the bottom surface, the better it will receive heat from the element and conduct heat to the food. Cookware that is warped or curved on the bottom will result in slow heat-up times and may not even boil water. Many brands feature cookware with an aluminum disk on the bottom, which makes good contact with the cooking surface.

    To verify if a pan has an absolutely flat bottom, take a ruler with you to the store when you shop. Follow these steps:
    Place a ruler along the bottom of the pan.
    Rotate the straight edge a full 360o around the bottom of the pan.
    Check for flatness in all directions.
    If you see light or a gap between the ruler and the pan bottom, the pan will not cook efficiently.

    jeff.
     
  4. Sep 29, 2006 #4

    ccc

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    If a glass cooktop is so hard to keep clean and new looking then why do people buy them? I had no idea it would be like this. Are you telling me Staub cookware is not good to use because it has an enamel-porcelain coated finish on it? It says it can be used on glass cooktops. It is cast-iron in the inside.
     
  5. Sep 29, 2006 #5

    jeff1

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    Not *I*...but -we- ( Amana. Maytag, MagicChef )...

    Ours so far is easy to keep clean :)

    jeff.
     
  6. Sep 30, 2006 #6

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    I cooked tonight on it and when I took the pot off the cooktop there were white marks on it. Last night the same thing and it took me hours to get it clean. I used flat bottom pots made out of stainless steele. I love to use cast iron to cook. Is there anything out there made with cast iron on the inside and stainless on the outside?
     
  7. Sep 30, 2006 #7

    ccc

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    I have used Revereware copper bottom pots that are about 45 years old and they do not leave any marks, however it is not recommended using copper bottom pots. I am totally confused.
     
  8. Sep 30, 2006 #8

    jeff1

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    Water marks?

    Might find something....

    http://www.epinions.com/hmgd-Cookware-All

    I have ( and use ) a couple of glass pans, also not recommended but they work well for me/us :)

    jeff.
     
  9. Oct 1, 2006 #9

    ccc

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    Jeff, thanks for the info. The white marks must not be water because I have to really scrub to get off. I have to leave a wet paper towel over marks for a long time and keep scrubing it off and on to get off.
     
  10. Oct 1, 2006 #10

    jeff1

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    Water marks are often a boil over or water on the pot bottom that gets flash boiled when it touches the element, this can leave the chemicals from water which gets kinda cooked onto the top.

    jeff.
     
  11. Oct 1, 2006 #11

    ccc

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    Oh, well it is a pain! I like for my cooktop to stay looking brand new. Coils with drip pans were much easier to keep clean.
     
  12. Oct 1, 2006 #12

    ccc

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    Cooktop.jpg Here is the little devil!
     
  13. Oct 1, 2006 #13

    jeff1

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    I like the 2 tier island on the right! :)

    Nice kitchen!!

    jeff.
     
  14. Oct 1, 2006 #14

    ccc

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    Thanks! I posted pictures on the Kitchen Pictures topic. You can see it better there.
     
  15. Dec 16, 2008 #15

    PJm

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    I use a scraper & ceramic cleaner and it works well
     
  16. Dec 16, 2008 #16

    woodchuck

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    I spray 409 antibacterial on and let it soak a few minutes then rub it with a plastic pot scrubber. A MR CLEAN pad does good also and hasn't scratched it. Also use the razor blade scraper. I think it's really easier to clean because stuff don't get down in the recesses etc.
     
  17. Dec 17, 2008 #17

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    We do this as well and works really well. We find boiled over water is a real pain but useing the above metod works good. We also find them a pain from time to time but love it hands down over the coils
     

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