Complete attic rewire

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by HandyAndy, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Nov 5, 2010 #1

    HandyAndy

    HandyAndy

    HandyAndy

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    I am looking to finish the attic/upstairs space that is currently unfinished, and turn it into a master bedroom. (sorry no pics) The only wiring up there right now is a single line running to the single light that lights the whole upstairs. I know I am going to run new 14-2 wire for all the new plugs, switches, etc... but here is my question.

    What do you guys suggest: I run 4 or 5 new lines from basement breaker box all the way up to the attic. (want to avoid this as it would be a lot of labor and wire to run but will do if necessary)
    or
    I run one 10 or 12 ga. line from the basement to a breaker box in the upstairs and tie all the lines back to that box.

    I realize I would need an access panel to the box which is fine, just not sure if its an accepted idea to have a second breaker panel. Just didn't know what others do or if there is an alternative to what I've thought of.

    Thanks all!!
     
  2. Nov 5, 2010 #2

    havasu

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    Adding a sub panel would probably be the way to go, and they are pretty inexpensive and simple to install.
     
  3. Nov 26, 2010 #3

    sailor86

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    How many circuits are you planning to need in this BR?
     
  4. Dec 3, 2010 #4

    HandyAndy

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    Probably 4-5 depending: 1 or 2 for plugs, 1 or 2 for lighting (can lights), 1 for celing fan, 1 for rotating/vibrating bed (just kidding on that one). I figure one of the 6 place boxes should do especially since they're only about $20 at Menards. As I said in the original post, I just didn't know if there was an alt to my thinking on how to run the wiring that I just didn't know about.
     
  5. Dec 3, 2010 #5

    JoeD

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    A sub panel has the same clearance requirements as a main panel. There must be a clear space in front of 3'x3'. It can't be in a bathroom or closet.

    If you run 14/3 cables you can get two circuits from one cable.
     
  6. Dec 3, 2010 #6

    sailor86

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    Depending on what size wire you are using and your local code, you can probably put everything in your BR on one breaker. For example, if running 14-2 romex, which is compatible with a 15-amp breaker, you can run anywhere from 10 to 20 devices on that one circuit. That would be any combination of lights and plugs. A standard BR may have 6 outlets, a fan and a light. That would be 8 devices. Easily covered under one circuit.
     
  7. Dec 4, 2010 #7

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    For real? You'd put up to 20 devices on a 15A circuit?
    You must save a lot on breakers. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Dec 4, 2010 #8

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    Thing is, in today's sucky world of AFCI's we cannot do this any longer.
    No one makes a two-pole AFCI any more.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2010
  9. Dec 4, 2010 #9

    havasu

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    lol........
     
  10. Dec 5, 2010 #10

    JoeD

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    Forgot about the new code requiring AFCI in all living areas. We don't have that issue in Canada. Only bedroom receptacles are required to be AFCI.
     
  11. Dec 5, 2010 #11

    sailor86

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    For future reference, how many things can you put on a 15 amp breaker? It's been a long time since I actually did the work.
     
  12. Dec 5, 2010 #12

    JoeD

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    1800 watts.
     
  13. Dec 5, 2010 #13

    sailor86

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    How many things do you all put on a 15-amp breaker?
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2010
  14. Dec 6, 2010 #14

    GBR

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  15. Dec 6, 2010 #15

    sailor86

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    I am reposting this question just to make sure it's noticed. How many things do you all put on a 15-amp breaker?
     
  16. Dec 6, 2010 #16

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    As with most things electrical, there is no one-size-fits-all answer.

    How many can you? As many as you want in a residential application.
    There are lots of codes and determining factors that would limit the number of items on a circuit in a residence though.

    How many would I? Typically between 6-10 "items".
     
  17. Dec 7, 2010 #17

    JoeD

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    Limit is 12 outlets on a circuit in Canada.
     

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