Does CGFI outlet need to be first in a series?

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by drumz, Oct 22, 2019.

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  1. Oct 22, 2019 #1

    drumz

    drumz

    drumz

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    The first outlet in a series in my kitchen is the perfect place for a USB plug (I looked for one that was CGFI too but no luck) and would like to move the CGFI to the next outlet. I have heard different things that it doesn't matter but I'm not so sure about that.
    Can someone confirm whether the CGFI has to be first or not?
    Thanks for your time :)
     
  2. Oct 22, 2019 #2

    Snoonyb

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    It does not have to be the first, however, the receptacle must be protected.

    Since there are two standard outlets in each GFI, and you only need one for a USB adaptor, is there more to the story?
     
  3. Oct 22, 2019 #3

    drumz

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    It's actually an outlet with 2 USB ports in it. So they would be unprotected.
    Looks like I can't do it.
    Thanks!
     
  4. Oct 23, 2019 #4

    Snoonyb

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    That's tru, unless you use, like I do, a USB adapter that plugs into a single recep. and supports 6 USB ports.
     
  5. Oct 23, 2019 #5

    Brian Famous

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    For what it's worth, I've tried two separate USB outlets, they both sucked. They were not putting out enough juice to rapid charge a phone, and took forever to charge a tablet. The first one stopped working entirely so i replaced it with a different version, and now we just dont use it at all...
    They seem like a great idea, but I'd rather go with a standard (or GFI) outlet and plug in a multi-port USB that is rated for rapid charge of multiple devices.
     
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  6. Oct 23, 2019 #6

    Snoonyb

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    I think what the OP is concerned with is that were the GFI trip, he'd lose everything powered from it.

    As inconvenient as that may seem, I'd find another source.
     
  7. Oct 23, 2019 #7

    Sparky617

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    I think the OP wants to install an outlet with a built-in USB charger. Like this https://www.lowes.com/pd/Legrand-ad...r-Resistant-Residential-Usb-Outlet/1001077978

    If the GFCI isn't the first in line, only the outlets AFTER the GFCI are protected by the GFCI outlet. Any between the breaker and the GFCI would only be protected by the breaker. You could replace the breaker with a GFCI breaker instead of using the GFCI outlet to protect the circuit. Otherwise to keep all the outlets protected the GFCI outlet needs to be first in line. I have one of the USB outlets at our kitchen desk and it works fine. Charging speed has never been an issue for my iPhone or iPad, but I'm usually charging them overnight so time isn't that terribly important.
     
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  8. Oct 23, 2019 #8

    Michael Armstrong

    Michael Armstrong

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    Of course, current code requires all kitchen receptacles to be GFCI-protected, so you couldn't just change the order of the string and put your USB receptacle first, and the GFCI 2nd. And my experience with the combo duplex/USB receptacles is the same as described in post #5 above. Plug-ins are cheaper, better, and easier to replace if necessary.
     
  9. Oct 26, 2019 #9

    pjones

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    It won’t work how you are wanting it to work. The GFCI only protects itself and any plugs wires to its LOAD side of it. The way you are wanting to connect it would have the USB receptacle connected to its LINE side of the GFCI and therefore be unprotected.

    Your best solution would be to use a GFCI circuit breaker in your panel so all the plugs can be protected (including the USB plug)
     

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