Does glue cure better with or without clamps?

Discussion in 'Carpentry and Woodworking' started by zepper, May 19, 2018.

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  1. May 19, 2018 #1

    zepper

    zepper

    zepper

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    Hey guys – I've just applied Titebond II to some wood and clamped it. The bottle says it should be clamped for 30 minutes, then allowed to set for 24 hours before it's subjected to stress.

    Are they just saying that 30 minutes is the minimum time you should clamp anything?

    Or are they actually recommending you remove the clamps after 30 minutes, then let the wood sit undisturbed for the rest of the curing period? (For example, could exposing the joint to more air between set-up and curing makes it stronger?)

    I'm sure many of you have anecdotal ideas about this. If possible, though, I'd like to hear from someone with a bit more scientific take on it. Thanks!
     
  2. May 19, 2018 #2

    zepper

    zepper

    zepper

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    Had it occurred to me, I would've used this title instead:

    Unclamping: Part of glue curing process?

    I don't see any way to edit the thread, though, or even my initial post. Oh well.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
  3. May 19, 2018 #3

    Steve123

    Steve123

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    They are saying to clamp for minimum of 30 minutes.

    If you read the FAQs on their web site, they say 30 minutes to an hour for an unstressed joint, and clamped for 24 hours for a stressed joint. So longer clamping gives a stronger joint.

    For best results, never work to a product's minimum requirements.
     
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  4. May 19, 2018 #4

    Snoonyb

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    Makes one wonder the actual advantages of research and development.

    I prefer hide glue.
     
  5. May 21, 2018 #5

    zepper

    zepper

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    Thanks, that answers my question. Guess I should've checked them first, but I assumed they'd just say what was on the bottle.

    Probably like you, I'm never in a rush; I prefer good work.

    Yes, hide glue's great. I first used it when I rebuilt a player piano's pneumatics several years ago. This excellent webpage, while specifically about player mechanisms, goes into much interesting detail on how and why hide glues are superior to white and yellow... Interesting stuff to anyone handy.

    I was already using Titebond for the banister I just finished, but I'll consider hide glue for the next project I do with precise fits. Thanks for the suggestion.

    BTW, here are a couple shots of the banister. I used fine-grain fir for the frame, oak for the mountings, and 9mm acrylic panels (rather than glass) for lower weight. I hid the screws in the posts by adding "keyhole" recesses to the facings that slid down over the screws and locked in place. Cheers!

    banister_00.jpg banister_01.jpg
     
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