Quantcast

first floor brick 2nd floor siding

Help Support House Repair Talk:

gilette

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Probably going to seem like a dumb question to some of you, but I've googled, asked my realtor, etc but cannot come up with a definite answer.

A house I am looking at buying is brick on the bottom, solid brick construction with headers, but the second floor has siding. Built in 1920s. All the nearby homes are similar, brick on the bottom and siding on the 2nd floor.

Does this mean that the 2nd floor is likely not brick?
Or is it common to put siding over the brick on the 2nd floor for some reason?
If not brick on the 2nd floor, is it studs sitting on top of the first floor brick?

I do not have a picture of the home currently but will go back in a day or 2 to take some if needed. Any help is much appreciated.
 

oldognewtrick

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jul 26, 2009
Messages
11,516
Reaction score
1,740
Location
Nashville, TN
It's very unlikely that there is brick behind the siding. There is most likely a stud wall with the siding attached. And :welcome: to House Repair Talk!
 

kok328

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Messages
2,951
Reaction score
296
The brick is not structural.
In other words it is not load bearing to the second floor. It is an exterior cover like siding.
 

gilette

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
It's very unlikely that there is brick behind the siding. There is most likely a stud wall with the siding attached. And :welcome: to House Repair Talk!
That is what I was thinking. I guess that's a common thing? Is it because it's less expensive to construct?

Thanks for the welcome :)
 

gilette

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
The brick is not structural.
In other words it is not load bearing to the second floor. It is an exterior cover like siding.
What makes you think that it is not structural? It has headers in it indicating that it's a 2 wythe wall, which I thought would be structural. It sits directly on top of the basement wall (which is partly exposed above the ground).

I appreciate any follow-up on this, I am just trying to learn
 

nealtw

Contractor retired
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
24,772
Reaction score
3,395
Location
Chiliwack BC Canada
Knock on doors up the street and ask what they know about the construction and what complaints they have. Any same problems in other houses can be expected or at least looked for.
 

Sparky617

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2014
Messages
1,327
Reaction score
460
Location
Cary NC
Brick can be structural. It generally isn't in homes built in the last 50 years or so, but it was a common building technique up until the early 1950's. A double layer of brick, with lath and plaster on the inside. Most brick homes built in the last 50 years are wood framed with a brick veneer. Homes in my childhood neighborhood were built in the early to mid-1950s and were of masonry construction that is a double layer of brick.

My parent's last house, built circa 1900 was masonry on three sides and framed on the back. We tore out all the old plaster and lath in the 1980's and rebuilt the thing from the brick inwards with framing, insulation, and drywall.
 
Last edited:

gilette

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Brick can be structural. It generally isn't in homes built in the last 50 years or so, but it was a common building technique up until the early 1950's. A double layer of brick, with lath and plaster on the inside.
Thanks, this is what I suspect this house is. Was built in the 1920s.

So 2 layers of brick, then lathe and plaster. Would there typically be studs between the brick and the lathe? How about insulation?

Does anyone know how they frame the 2nd floor, just put the bottom sill on top of the brick and secure it somehow?
 

Sparky617

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2014
Messages
1,327
Reaction score
460
Location
Cary NC
In our case, there was just furring strips nailed to the brick and no insulation. When we remodeled the place we built stud walls and updated the plumbing, electrical and insulation. Your second floor is likely framed on top of the brick walls if the house is true masonry construction. The brick provides a decent thermal mass, but once it gets cold in the winter, it stays pretty much cold if you are in a cold climate. Being built in the 1920's unless someone upgraded the house over the years you probably have minimal insulation anywhere.
 

Latest posts

Top