Framing a Fruit Cellar Door

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by acolic, Jan 9, 2018.

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  1. Jan 9, 2018 #1

    acolic

    acolic

    acolic

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    Hi

    I have a fruit cellar that is divided in two by an opening 60” by 85”.

    I want to put a 34” door in that opening. I know how to frame the door opening but my concern is that the opening is formed by cinder blocks.

    What would I cover the framed opening to the left and right of the door with?

    Drywall?

    Thanks

    Alex
     
  2. Jan 9, 2018 #2

    acolic

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    Sorry the title should have been Framing a Fruit Cellar Door.
     
  3. Jan 10, 2018 #3

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    I would use OSB instead of drywall.
     
  4. Jan 10, 2018 #4

    joecaption

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    I think the word you may be looking for is root cellar.
    Are you asking what to use for the casing around the frame?
    If so it's up to you how good you want it to look.
    It could be simple 1 X 4 pine, or use real window and door casing.
     
  5. Jan 10, 2018 #5

    Wuzzat?

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    If the relative humidity needs to be kept at 90%, wooden doors may warp.

    And stored vegetables/fruits, like in the hold of a ship, produce heat by some process.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  6. Jan 10, 2018 #6

    acolic

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    Lol yup root cellar
     
  7. Jan 10, 2018 #7

    acolic

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    Yup root cellar.
     
  8. Jan 10, 2018 #8

    acolic

    acolic

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    Hi not casing but how to cover the framing from the cinder wall to the door. If the width is 60” and I add a 34” door how do I cover the remaining 26”.

    One suggestion is OSB.
     
  9. Jan 10, 2018 #9

    Snoonyb

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    There are other ply products which are not inherently water resistant, as OSB is, and they are Plyscore and T-111.
     
  10. Jan 10, 2018 #10

    bud16415

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    When I hear root cellar I think cool and moist. I would go with PT framing and T111 sheathing.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2018 #11

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    PT wood has poison forced into it, so I'm not sure about using it for any indoor applications.
    And the last time I looked, it was not for ground contact, so why is it poisoned?
    Can't tell the players without a program. :(
     
  12. Jan 10, 2018 #12

    bud16415

    bud16415

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    Wuzzat? likes this.
  13. Jan 11, 2018 #13

    acolic

    acolic

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    Appreciate the help.
     
  14. Apr 2, 2018 #14

    JennieTroxel

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  15. Apr 20, 2018 #15

    Mastercarpenty

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    Some Fire Codes prohibit the use of treated lumber inside the structure because of poisonous gas emissions in a fire. I've got that in 2 of the 6 different code areas I now commonly work in. AFAIK it's always contra-indicated in food storage areas except where absolutely necessary, and then I'd like to see it 'encapsulated' even if only with paint.

    Food-prep and food storage areas have far different requirements than what's generally encountered in building. That's what I'd consider as most important here.

    Phil
     

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