Gas furnace problems

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by 1guitarman, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Oct 26, 2005 #1

    1guitarman

    1guitarman

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    I recently tried to start my LP gas furnace for the season, and couldn't get the pilot light to stay lit. It's an older model (Heil-Quaker model #NUGG100BA01) with a manually fired pilot. After some online investigating into usual suspects, I installed a new thermocouple (so much easier typing that than actually doing it- I actually had to drill the old one out of the brace!) and cleaned the pilot.

    Now when I attempt to light the pilot, the flame is about 4" long. This obviously scared the crap out of me, so I let go of the pilot button/switch. It went out right away. I tried it again and held it for about 45 seconds (to hopefully activate the thermocouple) and it still went out. With the pilot going crazy, I'm not very inclined to try it again.

    Before I installed the new T/C, the pilot light was at normal height when button/switch was held. There wasn't an unusually large build-up on the pilot before I cleaned it- I don't believe someone adjusted it up to compensate for a blockage (I'm not the original owner).

    For starters, I am not sure how to adjust the pilot light lower. Where are the adjusting screw(s) located? Secondly, is there something else I can check to find out why it isn't staying lit?

    It's getting colder and have too many other places for my few dollars to go right now! Any help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Nov 11, 2005 #2

    rabadger

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    You have to purchase a new LP gas pilot assembly. Sounds like you messed up the orfice.
     
  3. Apr 14, 2006 #3

    normlynn

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    Guitarman,
    I wasn't sure how to do a new posting here so I just replied to yours. I have an old (1989) Duomatic-Olsen 90% efficient updraft furnace in my old house. Someone I called for AC service told me I would need a new furnace because the area above the furnace is getting hot. There is a spot on the outside where there appears to be rust. One furnace guy I spoke with said it is because the paint burned off. (I just discovered I can't use the text tools above) Two of the repairmen are saying it is getting too hot. Could it be because the heat exchanger coils are dirty? What else could it be? Normlynn
     
  4. Apr 15, 2006 #4

    glennjanie

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    1Guitarman:
    Please call a registered LP gas repairman! You are in danger of blowing yourself and the whole house up. LP gas doesn't dissipate in the air like natural gas does; it lays in big puddles on the floor and will explode with the slightest spark.
    Glenn
     
  5. Apr 15, 2006 #5

    glennjanie

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    Normlynn, you are the victim of scam-artists. It is normal for a furnace to get hot. How else could it heat? No, the heat exchanger is not stopped up; if it were there would not be any heat getting through and your house would fill with smoke. I recommend a carbon monoxide detector (approx. $30) and if it goes off you need a new frunace. Check around and get a professional who is a member of PHCC (Plumbing Heating Cooling Contractors) or the Home Builder's Association.
    The local Better Business Bureau would appreciate a report on those other guys.
    Glenn
     
  6. Apr 29, 2006 #6

    tellerarms

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    I have an 17 year old model Trane XE60. We had a home inspector come out yesterday and look at the house (furnace included) and since he left our furnace pilot went out (connection/coincidence?), we follow the directions for lighting the pilot, but it won't stay lit. Once we let up on the button it goes out. We're cold! What can we do?
     
  7. Apr 30, 2006 #7

    woodworkingmenace

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    Tellerarms, its just a coincidence, (and they always seem to show up when some one inspects something...its murphys law or something like that), but, you will need a new thermocouple and the pilot light will stay lit.

    If you have a bad one, then the pilot light will not stay lit, and the thermocouple HAS to be in the flame, when you put the new one in, or it wont work! (You wouldnt believe some of the things I have seen...people not wanting them in there because they want to "save them"...LOL!! Oh well).

    It'll run ya about 4 bucks or so, then put it in per instructions and you will have heat..

    Just my two cents worth

    Jesse
     
  8. May 4, 2006 #8

    pqglen

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    I would agree with glenjanie. Get a licenced pro and spend a couple bucks and live. If you dont know what a thermocoupler is you probally shouldnt be replacing it.

    pqglen
     
  9. May 4, 2006 #9

    woodworkingmenace

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    I have NEVER heard of "drilling" out the thermocoupler in my life!

    You may have mess up the "orifice" in your haste to drill, slipped...

    Personally, I would have used some WD-40 or PB BLASTER on it, let it sit a few minues, then tapped it out with a small hammer downwards. (few small taps first and if that didnt work, then take a small wire brush and work around the thermocoupler in that manner)...

    Make sure you air it out very well, if you use a "flamable" product such as that, to get all the volatile organic contents out...


    Of course, this is for "future reference" since you already messed up the orifice...or, if you didnt, there should be a spring loaded screw somewhere to adjust the flame as on a gas furnace there is on the "gas valve".

    As was stated, if you dont know what your doing, get a qualified service person there to do it! Its not worth your life or your familys life, or even home or limb!...

    Just my two cents for what its worth, and a wee bit extra for the collection plate...

    Jesse
     
  10. May 6, 2006 #10

    asbestos

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    Yep this baby still runs, it is an oil fired water system. An old guy who runs a plumbing shop came out to see it and said it was the oldest he had seen in a few years. It has a newer burner, and a new circulator pump and one original pump. I am thinking it is time for a new one, but this baby refuses to die.
    And Oh, yeah The furnace with the burned paint -scary
     
  11. May 6, 2006 #11

    woodworkingmenace

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    If its THAT old, it would probably behoove ya to replace it with an entirely more energy efficient one.

    Especially with the price of oil, getting what it is now and later on, you have to be chucking good ol American green backs up the chimney at a tremendeous rate...

    I would check with your HVAC man, (in fact, get several opinions from around your area) and see what kind of savings it would produce, versus your old monster that refuses to die :)

    Jesse
     
  12. May 8, 2006 #12

    asbestos

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    Yeah it just may have to go, but it is going to be like 5k for a new one and I am not sure how much oil will be saved. but at 3.00+ a gallon it is going to get ugly.

    Also WWM does being placed in a tomb count as burial?
     
  13. May 8, 2006 #13

    woodworkingmenace

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    Yes it does.
    It was the way they used to bury people back then.

    Like Abraham and Sarah, his wife, and many others.

    Lazareth was 3 days in the tomb...

    It was a standard norm, since there were so many caves back then...

    Jesse
     
  14. May 8, 2006 #14

    woodworkingmenace

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    Would it be cheaper for you to look into Propane?

    I dont know what the going rate is now, or how cost effective it would be, but 5 grand seems a bit STEEP!

    (I am looking to replace my 25+ year old gas furnace and dont expect to pay more than 1500 for it, but, I recognise that Oil is "way" more expensive than a regular gas one would be...still... ya gotta wonder about propane though).

    I would check with the people who sells these things, and get a good "heads up" on the cost efficiency ratio compared to oil. BTU - dollars. That is, unless you have regulations about having propane in certain areas, like a City or Municpality... Some dont like those tanks hanging around the neighborhood... (I have a propane storage facility across the highway from me, and consider it a huge bomb! Right across the street from it is our High School and they fought tremendously to keep it out of our neighborhood!!).

    Also, I would think about adding all the additional insulation you can add for more fuel savings.

    Just some random thoughts for today...

    Jesse
     
  15. Jun 29, 2006 #15

    maxq4@yahoo.com

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    I have the same unit and I am having a problem with it. My condiser line from the ac unit has frozen and I am tring to find out something about the problem. Have you ever had this problem, and if so, how did you rectify it. I would also like to know where the filter goes. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated
     
  16. Jun 29, 2006 #16

    maxq4@yahoo.com

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    I have a trane xe 60 and the line from the ac has frozen what should i do. I have already put a humidifier in the basement near the furnace. I cant find where to put the air filter, I have been told to replace it, but I don't know where it would go.
    [




    QUOTE=woodworkingmenace]Tellerarms, its just a coincidence, (and they always seem to show up when some one inspects something...its murphys law or something like that), but, you will need a new thermocouple and the pilot light will stay lit.

    If you have a bad one, then the pilot light will not stay lit, and the thermocouple HAS to be in the flame, when you put the new one in, or it wont work! (You wouldnt believe some of the things I have seen...people not wanting them in there because they want to "save them"...LOL!! Oh well).

    It'll run ya about 4 bucks or so, then put it in per instructions and you will have heat..

    Just my two cents worth


    I have a trane xe 60 and the line from the ac has frozen what should i do. I have already put a humidifier in the basement near the furnace. I cant find where to put the air filter, I have been told to replace it, but I don't know where it would go.

    Jesse[/QUOTE]
     
  17. Jun 29, 2006 #17

    glennjanie

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    Hello All:
    The frozen a/c line can best be cured by insulating the line with closed cell foam insulation (Armaflex). The line is cold, its doing a good job; problem is there is warm moist air around it which condenses on the line and turns to frost.
    To find a filter I would locate the blower; the filter is usually near the blower, somewhere in the duct that returns air to the blower.:D
    Glenn
     

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