gas stove in basement apartment

Discussion in 'General Appliance Discussion' started by carpjim1, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. Jul 5, 2014 #1

    carpjim1

    carpjim1

    carpjim1

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am creating a kitchen and a downstairs apartment. I would like to install a gas stove, furnace, and water heater in the same room. What kind of ventilation and or drain will this require?
    I'm in Colorado.
     
  2. Jul 10, 2014 #2

    carnuck

    carnuck

    carnuck

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    19
    You should be able to access the building code online for your area, but the question is do you have egress (exit) on this level? If not, anyone down there could drown in a flood from a burst watermain or sudden "wave". Happened to a friend of ours. They were on the side of a hill and the heavy snow did a fast melt in the rian and flowed over the concrete basement wall and drowned her because the door couldn't be opened against the "flood".

    http://www.komonews.com/news/local/5887271.html
     
  3. Jul 10, 2014 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,889
    Likes Received:
    3,114
    Welcome to the site.
    Newer furnaces and instant hot water can vent to an outside wall. The stove will need a vented hood, drain will be up to local code.
     
  4. Jul 10, 2014 #4

    beachguy005

    beachguy005

    beachguy005

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Messages:
    844
    Likes Received:
    310
    While I'm generally all for DIYing it. Not so sure here.
    I think the main danger here is not from flooding but from carbon monoxide poisoning or gas poisoning. I don't know if all 3 appliances will be gas but that's one area I rather get the licensed pros involved.
     
    nealtw likes this.
  5. Jul 10, 2014 #5

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    You need to know the total BTU input for those appliances which info is on the nameplates, then search on "combustion air".
     
    nealtw likes this.
  6. Jul 11, 2014 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,889
    Likes Received:
    3,114
    BTU don't matter you need fire air anyway.
     
  7. Jul 11, 2014 #7

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  8. Jul 11, 2014 #8

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    593
    Been here, done this ... Exterior venting is mandatory for your appliances. Make sure it is clear from any upstairs windows so your off-gasses do not come back inside. That means your ducting will be specified by code.

    An exterior mounted tankless water heater might be your best bet. Eliminates the need for exterior venting from the inside -- but you still have to follow code to avoid re-entry of exhaust gasses upstairs. Also, snow accumulation is a concern because you cannot let the unit get buried! ... So, you might end up using an interior mounted tankless with exterior venting and a way to conceal it for aesthetic reasons.

    The furnace and its location does present problems. Obviously exterior venting is needed but it also needs a closet to isolate it. The closet door vents are determined by how much combustion air your unit requires. There is a standard formula for this. If your house is extremely weather tight, where will that air come from? Also need to consider the HVAC ducting, the size/design, and where it will go in your downstairs ceiling ...

    And while we are dancing around permitting, have you factored the need for additional electricity? Your pre-wiring will be crucial to supply the demands ... and let them pay for the added usage. And, I wonder if you are wanting to add a separate meter for power? If so, you will need a sub-panel, permits, inspections, etc.

    Hope these thoughts help ...
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
    nealtw and Wuzzat? like this.

Share This Page