How to Bore into a Stud

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by mattspeer01, Oct 11, 2014.

  1. Oct 11, 2014 #1

    mattspeer01

    mattspeer01

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    I am trying to install a cable routing kit for a wall mounted TV. I have run into a stud that runs parallel to the wall (not the normal ones perpendicular to the wall that you hang stuff on). As a result, I can't sit the junction box flush in the wall because that weird stud is too close to the front of the drywall. I am about half and inch too shallow. Can I bore into the stud somehow to carve out a half inch deep circle so that I can push the box in further so it sits flush? I don't want to cut a hole all the way through the stud since I'm not sure what's on the other side of it.

    Pics are attached.

    20141010_203215.jpg

    20141010_203159.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2014
  2. Oct 11, 2014 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Welcome the site and to the school of what can go wrong will.
    What you have found is the backing for a wall that joins to this wall on the other side. The easiest fix would be to repair that hole and move over sideways to an open cavity and try again.
    Or you can get a spade bit for your drill and whitle away some wood until it fits.
     
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  3. Oct 11, 2014 #3

    beachguy005

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    Doesn't look like a "grommet" you're using but a round junction box. Is that an HDMI cable? If that's the case you don't even need a j-box, just a shallow frame to mount a wall plate on.
     
  4. Oct 11, 2014 #4

    mattspeer01

    mattspeer01

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    The easiest fix would be to repair that hole and move over sideways to an open cavity and try again.

    Wouldn't that same wood be in the other cavities as well along that same wall? It's a small wall and backs up to our master bathroom on the other side.

    Is that an HDMI cable?

    Yes, but the TV power cable plugs into the top junction box. The top junction box is connected to a lower junction box by a wall-rated power cable. You plug into the wall outlet with a cable coming out of the lower junction box. My understanding is that you can't just run a normal power cable through the wall cavity, it has to be specially rated otherwise it is a fire hazard.

    So basically what I am saying is that the picture doesn't show that there is a power cable running from the back of the top junction box through the wall cavity to the back of a lower junction box (not pictured).
     
  5. Oct 11, 2014 #5

    beachguy005

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    If you're running power, then I'm with nealtw on this. That stud is from a wall that's at a right angle to the one your box is going in. You may also be able to find a shallower box.
    As for the power and the HDMI...they typically aren't in the same box. Usually you'll run just a piece of romex from the lower receptacle up to the upper one. Another separate box for your HDMI. You could also have used a special box that has a partition in it to separate the power from data if you want them in the same box.
     
  6. Oct 11, 2014 #6

    kok328

    kok328

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    I don't know if that is "backing" or a fire break.
    Use a shallow box and bring the wires in through the sides of the box instead of the back of the box.
     
  7. Oct 11, 2014 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Boys, that's a special extension cord that normally does not run in walls but in this case has some code complience. so changing the box would be a no no. That is if it is aproved where it is being used.

    That stud arrangement is for adjoining walls. So you should be able to find a cavitty near by, but don't expect the next studs to be 16 OC to this one.
     
  8. Oct 12, 2014 #8

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

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    Your best solution is to relocate the position of your new box. Go around the wood, don't force the situation.

    In situations like this, I have taken to using Forstner bits instead of spade bits. The tip is not as deep so it prevents the tip from hitting other things in the wood. The bit is flat bottomed, so it is more precise. The more I use these bits, the more often I find uses for them ... Sure, they are primarily for precision woodworking, no hogging out wood, but if the tool works, use it!

    BITS.jpg
     
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