How to fix aluminum siding

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by rogar6, Jun 8, 2017.

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  1. Jun 8, 2017 #1

    rogar6

    rogar6

    rogar6

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    I think someone banged into this vertical piece of siding trim and pulled it away from the brick molding.

    I could caulk it but is there a better way to close the large gap?

    Sorry about the pics not being upright.

    rogar6_01.jpg

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2017
  2. Jun 8, 2017 #2

    rogar6

    rogar6

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    Forgot to mention I can't move the trim piece back in place by hand.
     
  3. Jun 8, 2017 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Can you take it off and do a little body work to get it closer to shape. Often these things are made on site to fit. You might find a sheet metal shop to make a new one.
     
  4. Jun 12, 2017 #4

    aNYCdb

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    If you can find a spray paint that matches I would use bondo to fill the dents and then paint it. It's hard to tell from the picture what is preventing the piece from being positioned back in place.
     
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  5. Jun 12, 2017 #5

    oldognewtrick

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    I think bondo would have a hard time staying on the thin aluminum due to the thermal expansion and contraction of the metal as it goes through heat and cooling cycles. A roll of trim coil is about $50.00. Find a siding guy and have him form new trim pieces.
     
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  6. Jun 13, 2017 #6

    rogar6

    rogar6

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    Thanks for the replies.

    The bondo idea isn't bad because it, along with some backer rod would be a good product to use to fill up 95% of the gap and then fill up the remaining gap with a small amount of caulk even though I originally wanted to avoid using caulk but that was because I didn't want to fill the fairly large void with an entire tube of caulk.
     
  7. Jun 13, 2017 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    can you not see the screws or what ever is holding it on.
     
  8. Jun 16, 2017 #8

    Mastercarpenty

    Mastercarpenty

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    Look on the sides and you'll see the nails which hold it on. Grab them with good pliers or vise-grips and twist & pull those out. If the heads separate then push the shaft through with a nail-set. Do NOT try to pull these like a nail in a board or you'll bend the metal beyond repair. Once the metal is off, lay it face-down ob a soft board and gently bang it back into shape. Better to stop short of perfect as a slight dent looks better than a bulge. Put it back the same way with trim nails made for the job, then caulk as needed.

    Often siding installers will leave the metal a bit loose, or will use a straight bend instead of following a contour underneath. It looks better that way but it leaves it vulnerable to denting. Bondo doesn't work well here because of the metal being too thin and flexibile. If you ever need a replacement piece, look for a crew doing a siding job. Bring them your old piece (no matter how crumpled) and they'll bend you a new one for a few bucks- bum some nails while you're there. If you call a siding contractor to do this they will charge dozens of dollars to do the same thing due to the time needed to set up the metal brake and stow it afterward.

    Phil
     
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