How to install wood steps against concrete patio

Discussion in 'Bricks, Masonry and Concrete' started by Justus, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. Sep 4, 2009 #1

    Justus

    Justus

    Justus

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    Hi all! My husband and I want to add new wooden steps to the front of our home. We have a concrete porch along the entire front of the house, and three concrete steps on one end. The existing steps are uneven in height and a bit difficult to navigate, as well as they have no railing. We want to add wooden steps (not over the concrete steps - in a different area) but don't know how to attach a facer (?) board to the concrete. Any suggestions? Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2009
  2. Sep 4, 2009 #2

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

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    You might need a permit to permanently attach something to the home.
    Use a hammer drill to make the holes in the slab (approx. 4-6" deep).
    Center your holes vertically so you don't drill too close to the slab surfaces.
    Purchase some threaded rod and cut to length (approx. 8").
    Purchase some epoxy adhesive designed for masonry.
    Put the epoxy in the hole and run the threaded rod into the hole, leaving about 2 inches exposed (cut excess as necessary).
    Allow to set up per mfgr. recommendations and then attach the "facer" board to the exposed rods with a washer and nut.
    Do not use expansion anchors or you will stand the chance of cracking the slab.
     
  3. Sep 5, 2009 #3

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Welcome Justus:
    I would just like to add, the wood should be all treated wood for contact with the concrete and general outdoor use.
    Glenn
     
  4. Sep 5, 2009 #4

    Justus

    Justus

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    Kok328 - I think our concrete porch has a hollow center, but we are not certain of this. The porch is 1'4" tall (ground to top surface), 3'10" deep (front edge of porch to front of house) and 27' long (side to side). You said we should not use expansion anchors. If the center is hollow, how do we secure the threaded rods if they are longer than the depth of the concrete. We do not know how thick the concrete is. Is there a general rule of thumb for this or does it vary?

    We have already checked for local codes and permits. We can add the steps without a permit. : -)

    Glennjanie - thank you for the welcome and the further suggestion. We appreciate it! : -)
     
  5. Sep 5, 2009 #5

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

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    without seeing it, I assume you may have a poured slab. If you center the holes you stand a better chance of drilling into the slab. It should be at least 3" thick. Otherwise, the epoxy with threaded rod should hold in the portion of the hold on the cap of the slab. It's just stairs not really anything load bearing. I used this technique to extend my concrete porch with a wood deck and it worked fine. If you do end up driliing through to a hollow area, you can go with large toggle bolts instead.
     
  6. Sep 6, 2009 #6

    911handyman

    911handyman

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    Remember any wood that touches concrete needs to be pressure treated, and or use a self sticking adheasive to the area that will touch concrete. Roofing felt will work as well as a ice and water membrane for roofing.
     
  7. Sep 7, 2009 #7

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

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    Plan "B". Secure a board to the sidewalk slab approaching the porch and toe nail or screw your stringers to that. One in the front by the porch step and one in the back by the first step should make for a secure set of steps that won't twist around.
     

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