Interior Trim Nightmare

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by Perkdawgin, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. Jun 21, 2009 #1

    Perkdawgin

    Perkdawgin

    Perkdawgin

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    For the past three years my buddies and I have been finishing my basement and we finally reached the trim phase. I was looking at each of my doors and realized i made a small mistake on some of the doors that now has me baffeled. On several of the doors we did not leave the correct spacing for the dry wall. Now the drywall sticks out past the door frame about 1/4 inch. I dont know what I should/how I should fix this problem. Please give me some simple awnsers and a good descriptions of what tools I will need.

    Thanks,

    Alex
     
  2. Jun 21, 2009 #2

    travelover

    travelover

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    Using a table saw, I'd cut a piece of wood just thick enough to bring the door frame even with the drywall. Carefully attach with finish nails (I'd pre-drill the nail holes) and glue. Once you sand and paint or stain it, you won't notice.
     
  3. Jun 22, 2009 #3

    Perkdawgin

    Perkdawgin

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    If the door frame is oak, do i have to use oak?
     
  4. Jun 22, 2009 #4

    Blue Jay

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    If you do not use oak it will stand out when you finish it, don't know if that would bother you or not.
     
  5. Jun 22, 2009 #5

    Nestor_Kelebay

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    Perkdawgin:

    You've already gotten the best advice. Another option would be to take the door frame moldings you intended to use to any place with a table saw and get them to clamp a "sacrificial fence" onto the fence of their table saw.

    A sacrificial fence is nothing more than a piece of wood that you can wreck by moving the fence so close to the table saw blade that the blade cuts slightly into the sacrificial fence.

    With the sacrificial fence in place, run the door frame moldings through their table saw to cut a 1/8 inch deep "rabbet" into the back of the door frame moldings to accomodate the increased thickness of the wall.

    That way, you can nail the door frame moldings on normally, and the rabbet on the back of those moldings will accomodate the increased thickness of the wall.

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  6. Jun 25, 2009 #6

    Perkdawgin

    Perkdawgin

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    I reckon the best/easiest would be to add an oak piece to the door frame and put the trim on over the drywall and door frame/oak piece. Thank you for the advice, now i get to rent a table saw!!!
     
  7. Jun 26, 2009 #7

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    Almost every lumber yard that caters to woodworkers will have a table saw and will cut your wood or their wood to your specifications.

    Just pick out a piece of oak that's similar in grain and colour to the stuff your door frames are made out of, and take it to any place that caters to the wood working crowd and tell then the width and height of the shims you need.
     

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