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Load Bearing Wall Question

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rccoburn

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I would like to remove a wall and am 80% sure it is non load bearing. I would appreciate any input into whether or not I am missing something. I have a two story 1920's "solid brick" home (exterior brick walls are load bearing). The wall in question is on the first floor and runs parallel to the floor joists. It has a large opening for pocket doors. By removing the pocket doors I can visibly see that the wall studs are attached to the floor and ceiling joists. I cannot however tell if they continue beyond the ceiling joists. There is another wall directly above the one in question, so it's possible the 1st floor wall and 2nd floor wall share common studs. Lastly, if the wall is not load bearing, but has common studs with the 2nd floor wall, what precautions do I need to take when removing the wall? Thanks in advance.

1st Floor.jpg
 

kok328

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Install temporary bracing while removing the wall.
I doubt the studs extend to the second floor. For good measure, install a header in the opening to support the upstairs wall (regardless of weight bearing).
 

nealtw

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Moist often the only walls that had one piece studs were bearing walls but if your studs do go thru and are not load bearing you can just add blocking beside them between two floor joist and lock everything in place before you remove the lower part.
 

Snoonyb

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I would like to remove a wall and am 80% sure it is non load bearing. I would appreciate any input into whether or not I am missing something. I have a two story 1920's "solid brick" home (exterior brick walls are load bearing). The wall in question is on the first floor and runs parallel to the floor joists. It has a large opening for pocket doors. By removing the pocket doors I can visibly see that the wall studs are attached to the floor and ceiling joists. I cannot however tell if they continue beyond the ceiling joists. There is another wall directly above the one in question, so it's possible the 1st floor wall and 2nd floor wall share common studs. Lastly, if the wall is not load bearing, but has common studs with the 2nd floor wall, what precautions do I need to take when removing the wall? Thanks in advance.
While the 1st floor wall "appears" to be non load bearing, the 1st floor ceiling joists, are probably also, the the 2nd floor, floor joists.

The 2nd floor wall, floor joists and ceiling joists may be a load bearing element not to be ignored.

The following will help you to determine that;If you have a basement with a center support beam and this wall occurs above above that beam, either parallel or perpendicular with the floor joists, it could be*load*bearing.

Treat the 2nd floor attic as if it were a single story because the same principles apply

If your house is single story, in the attic, if the ceiling joists continue over it, end over it, are spliced over it, or you have roof bracing landing on it, It's a*bearing*wall. If the ceiling joist are parallel with the wall and you have roof bracing landing on it, It's a*bearing*wall.

If there is a 2nd floor above the wall, you have two options. You can remove a section of ceiling on both sides of the wall to determine if the 2nd floor, floor joists, cross it or end over it. If so, Its*load*bearing. Or you can use a stud finder to determine the location and direction of the joists.

Here is a link that
should be of assistance;
http://www.awc.org/pdf/WCD1-300.pdf*Illegitimas non-carborundum
 

rccoburn

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Thanks for the replies. I think I'll take it slow and remove the plaster and lath from the wall and around the ceiling to get a better look. Based on the comments, it seems it's most likely not load bearing because 1) it runs parallel to the floor and ceiling joists, 2) it does not extend to the roof rafters and 3) there are no support beams underneath it in the basement. And to address Snoonyb comment about the attic, the attic floor/2nd floor ceiling joists run parallel to the 2nd floor wall and rest on the exterior load bearing brick walls.

I did find a photo of an identical wall online. It looks to be the exact same construction, including the floor joists being parallel to the wall (old flooring was installed parallel to and directly on the joists, no subfloor).

I will probably install a header or support beam and tie it into the walls on either end.

NPApocket1-740.jpg
 

Snoonyb

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Leave no stone unturned, least you find yourself under it.
 

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