Moulding with rounded corners

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by WalterSobcheck, May 23, 2006.

  1. May 23, 2006 #1

    WalterSobcheck

    WalterSobcheck

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    So I've finished laying tiles in my kitchen and want to upgrade the millwork around the bottom of my cabinets going into my TV room. Thing is, I have rounded corners in my house, which greatly reduces the ease with which an amatuer like me can install it. So much for setting my miter saw at 45 degrees and calling it good. I know there are general guidelines out there for the angles with which to cut the stuff, but I don't want to waste any more moulding than I already have with mistakes and trial and error. Thanks for any help.:eek:
     
  2. May 23, 2006 #2

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    Set the saw at 22 and 1/2 degrees and you end up with a small piece in between the other long miters. Try it with some scrap wood and you will figure it out. Caulk the top or use colored filler if you have stained trim.:)
     
  3. May 23, 2006 #3

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    As inspectorD says. Here is a picd of what a crown looks like with that kind of corner.

    crowns.jpg
     
  4. May 24, 2006 #4

    asbestos

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  5. May 24, 2006 #5

    inspectorD

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    Thank you Daryl,
    that is an excellent picture showing what a rounded corner ends up looking like. See how formal it ends up looking. Now do a piece of baseboard installed upside down and make it a two piece crown.It is inexpensive and you already have everything set up.Just make a jig and mark the wall where the bottom of the base ends up. It really only takes a few hours more tops once you get a rhythm.:D
     
  6. May 24, 2006 #6

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Now do a piece of baseboard installed upside down and make it a two piece crown.
    Interesting idea, by any chance would you have a pic to look at.
     
  7. May 25, 2006 #7

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    No pictures in my folders....Basically it just jumps the crown out another 3/4 inches. Put a piece of base upside down on the wall and adjust the base up or down until it looks good with the crown attached to the face of it. The crown then gets installed to the base...there is usually only 1 inch of the upsidedown base cap that shows. The base board gets nailed first and it makes a solid anchor to nail the crown to.:D
     
  8. May 9, 2008 #8

    98happy

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    Okay so I understand how to do the cuts for the rounded corners but....how wide is the bottom of that cut.
     
  9. May 9, 2008 #9

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    If I get what you are asking...it is usually an 1 1/4 inch piece. It all depends on the tape job and the radius of the corner. Test some cuts to figure it out first. Always buy extra crown.:)
     
  10. May 10, 2008 #10

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    I have had the bottoms anywhere from 5/8- 3/4 depending on the mudding job and weather or not the corner is actually a 90 degree. As mentioned you need some test pieces and some patients.
     
  11. Sep 12, 2009 #11

    paulmar

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    The 22.5-degree cuts are a great idea, but it led me to thinking "Why not use two small pieces instead of just one to make it blend in with the corner even better?" So in total, you would use 4 pieces of molding for the corner, each cut at 15 degrees. It took me a couple of hours to get it right for just one corner, but once you have one done, it's easy to use as a template for the others. WARNING: Do not attempt to hold the tiny piece of molding with your hand while you cut it with a miter saw! Use duct tape or heavy duty packing tape to keep your 1-inch long piece from getting damaged. A wood file also helps to fine tune the cuts for a perfect fit, and if you get a file that's about the same width as your molding, you can file small flat indentations into the rounded baseboard to make it easier to set the pieces in place for nailing. If you think the 3-piece corner looks nice and formal, try the 4-piece corner and everyone will be asking you who you hired to do the molding :D

    Baseboard.jpg
     
  12. Sep 13, 2009 #12

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    Making those small pieces could be done safely on a miter saw. You just use a long piece and cut the same distance off one end, moving the blade from one side of the center line to the other side with every cut. Also, every second piece you'd cut would be scrap, but I'd rather throw away a bit of wood than risk cutting off a finger.

    That'd be best done by clamping a wood stop to the fence so that all pieces are cut to the same length.

    If I were doing it, I'd cut them all a tiny bit shorter than they needed to be, nail them into place, then apply a latex caulk to fill in the gaps, and remove the excess caulk with a damp sponge so that only the gaps had caulk in them. Latex caulk shrinks as it dries, so you'd have to caulk twice; the second time to fill in shrinkage. But, after painting it would look fine.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2009

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