Putting cinder block foundation in existing garage

Discussion in 'Bricks, Masonry and Concrete' started by agreendc, Aug 29, 2016.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Aug 29, 2016 #1

    agreendc

    agreendc

    agreendc

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hello everyone, I'm new here so hopefully this is the correct place for this post. Further, if this has been covered elsewhere a link would work well too.

    Details of my situation: I have a 1.5 car garage (has an attached open patio, with a block floor, that makes it around 2 cars, but the patio part doesn't need anything done) that is studded walls sitting directly on top of a concrete pad. The footers in most places are pretty severely rotted and there appears to be water damage up approximately 2 feet in some places.

    My thought on fixing it, which has been confirmed by a Handy-man branch of a contracting company: Support the garage, cut out some amount of the bottom of the wall, place cinder blocks on the pad, and build the wall back down on top of the blocks.

    This will be by far my most ambitious home improvement project, but I am usually a fast learner.

    Questions:
    1) The overall idea is sound, correct?
    2) Would 1 row of blocks be enough, or would I need 2?
    3) With the walls sitting on them, would I need rebar or some sort of anchor for the blocks? I don't remember the contractor mentioning anchors, but maybe it's assumed. I wouldn't think it would be necessary, but obviously I am no expert.
    4) I assume I'd need pictures here, but how many places would the rafters need support to do 1 wall at a time? (The is supported by four 4x4's, so I'd guess this is a good starting point) Or would I be better off doing it all in 1 shot?
    5) To make it more water tight I was thinking I'd find some sort of roll on water barrier, any suggestions? I don't need waterproof, the project is simply to avert future damage to the garage.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Aug 29, 2016 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Welcome to the site. You are in the right place and you have the right solution to the problem.
    You would like to keep the wood 6 to 8" above the ground level. One high is fine if that works.
    If the wall is bolted down now you and get extension nuts to add ready rod up to the new height.
    You can lift 8 ft at a time by just putting studs under each rafter to the floor, 1/4 inch to long hammer them into place
     
    agreendc likes this.
  3. Aug 29, 2016 #3

    agreendc

    agreendc

    agreendc

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Thanks.

    And if there isn't anything securing the footer to the slab now?
     
  4. Aug 29, 2016 #4

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    5,319
    Likes Received:
    1,880
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Where are you located and what is your frost depth? Your slab may be just sitting on grade and your posts went down to below the frost depth. In that case the pad is free to float with the freeze. With a block wall you need to support the block below grade with blocks and below the frost line a footer.

    Pictures will help a lot.
     
  5. Aug 29, 2016 #5

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    I think you mean bottom plate, if bolted remove nuts, if nailed, there will pop out fairly easy most of the time..
    A footer is concrete base below the foundation.
    You will want to see if Bud, has a point, is there more concrete below the slab where the posts are.
     
  6. Aug 29, 2016 #6

    agreendc

    agreendc

    agreendc

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yes, by footer I meant the 2x4 that is sitting directly on the concrete.

    I will take some pictures tonight and put them up tonight or tomorrow.

    It looks like that wood is just sitting on the concrete, sounds like that is unlikely to actually be the case though.
     
    nealtw and bud16415 like this.
  7. Aug 30, 2016 #7

    GBR

    GBR

    GBR

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    38
    "You can lift 8 ft at a time by just putting studs under each rafter to the floor, 1/4 inch to long hammer them into place "-------------------

    may want them under the lower top plate near the rafter so you don't rip the wood out of the rafter (only toe-nailed) if you forgot an anchor bolt still holding the wall down...

    Gary
     
    nealtw likes this.
  8. Aug 30, 2016 #8

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Yes I do live where every rafter has a hurricane tie.
     
  9. Aug 30, 2016 #9

    agreendc

    agreendc

    agreendc

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Took some pictures of the worst damage and a couple anchor bolts.

    Here is an older picture of the entire structure, the patio portion is on the reasons I don't want to attempt lifting the whole structure, that portion is in good shape as is.

    I'll take some more pictures of the rafters later so you guys can help confirm for me where they should be supported.

    IMG_0239.jpg

    IMG_0240.jpg

    picture-uh=ebe123ff897b21fc46863714ca71ed-ps=ad45a0a72f8492a23768b0a59bdbba88.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016
  10. Aug 30, 2016 #10

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    5,319
    Likes Received:
    1,880
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    I would still dig down a foot or so in one small place at the edge of the slab to figure out if the slab is laid just on the ground or if it has a deeper pour around the outside.

    Not that if it doesn’t you will change your plans all that much. Figure out how high you have to trim everything off and that will tell you how much you will have to replace. With blocks or I might do it with some PT wood, maybe 6x6 or 4x6. Take the bottom 2 rows of siding off to start.
     
  11. Aug 30, 2016 #11

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,701
    Likes Received:
    3,360
    Location:
    Chiliwack BC Canada
    Just dig down the far left corner and see how thick the slab is.
    We don't want to lift the building , 1/4 to 1/2 inch in areas at a time will not hurt anything.
    The area to the left of the big door will want to be looked at for how that was constructed.
     

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page