Sill replacement or ?

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by watchtower7, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. Jun 4, 2008 #1

    watchtower7

    watchtower7

    watchtower7

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    I am buying a house, 1948 model, lots of updates from professional contractors, city approved.
    On the disclosure, seller noted termite damage/sill replacement at time of her purchase (1988).
    Our termite guy found the other side of the house had old termite (not active) or moisture damage requiring replacement @$2500.
    Seller brought in another guy, recomended doing a cosmetic (attaching support to foundation and joists) but not sill replacement stating this was a "minimally invasive" repair.
    Homeowner feels risk of jacking up and replacing sill not worth the risk (cracked walls, etc.), the house has settled to a "comfortable" point, I am worried the next buyer might not be so understanding.
    Any feelings?
    And is there an insurance rider homeowner can add to cover potential damage if sill replacement is done?
    Thanks, I don't know what to do.
     
  2. Jun 4, 2008 #2

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    Housebroken Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    The sellers will most likely have to repair any damage just to sell the house to you or future folks. Ask them to do it the way you want, or don't buy it. Or you can have them put some money from the sale into escrow to fix the damage after you buy it.
    I'll bet it gets fixed.

    And yes, change the sill back to original condition, or it will have a stigma attached to it.

    Get a home inspection, www.ashi.com, it's worth every penny you spend.
     
  3. Aug 1, 2008 #3

    Perry Degener

    Perry Degener

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  4. Aug 1, 2008 #4

    Perry Degener

    Perry Degener

    Perry Degener

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    Try penetrating epoxy to make repairs before wholesale extraction. You can use MinWax wood hardener or West System epoxy or Git Rot from West Marine supply company. Those of us who fix wooden boats swear by it. You drill holes in the rotted wood, let it dry--then you can inject (syringe) or brush in the epoxy mix.
     
  5. Jul 31, 2012 #5

    scotter87

    scotter87

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    I have a seller/buyer with a similar situation, minor sill damage from termites, interested in the apoxy injection solution, anyone have any experience with this?
     
  6. Aug 3, 2012 #6

    BridgeMan

    BridgeMan

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    Back in my working days, I specified and administered the epoxy injection of hundreds of timber and concrete structures. No houses, but rather bridge foundations, girders and parking structures. When done properly with the correct product by someone who knows what he/she is doing, epoxy injection can satisfactorily restore all types of damaged wood and concrete members. However, trying to inject a rotted sill plate could be futile, as any injection system requires that the injected material has enough adequate native product present for it to bond with--I'm not sure powdered termite residue meets that requirement. The exothermic properties of most low viscosity epoxies will result in them boiling themselves apart if too many voids are present. It takes an experienced eye to determine if the questionable members are good candidates for injection. Complete replacement of same is often the better course of action.
     

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